Hyundai Santa Cruz Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Interesting comments from Motortrend when testing the Santa Fe.

I had a Dual Clutch Fiesta and it was fun in the hills but for regular city driving and just going up my driveway-pausing-inching forward it would buck a little.. stop and go was also bucky for lack of a better word.

So... not sure I would go with the Turbo if it only got the DC... we'll see once some youtube reviewers start posting impressions. The good news is that will keep the cost down if I only go for the 2.5 NA and normal transmission.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
The relevant part is here for the lazy:
The issue is with the 2.5T model's transmission. Where the standard 2.5-liter models use an eight-speed automatic, the 2.5T models get an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic that's simply not ready for duty in a family SUV here or in the three-row Sorento. Hyundai points out this is a wet-type dual-clutch transmission, which the automaker says "greatly reduces most drivability concerns." All we can go by is our test SUV, which delivered rough shifts from a stop and at city-driving speeds—there was no escaping its lack of refinement. If we were in the market for a Santa Fe—and there are good reasons to consider one—we would steer clear of the responsive but rough dual-clutch as well as the somewhat surgey 2.5-liter turbocharged I-4. Or, we'd try the hybrid.
I'll want to see for myself, because the same 7-speed dry DCT they put in the Kia Soul was jerky, whereas the programming for the Kia Seltos was fine IMO.

A wet DCT shouldn't be inherently jerky, so that's probably something they will patch with a software update down the road for the Santa Fe, and may have already been done for the Santa Cruz. What is promising is that the 2.5T AWD gets the same highway fuel economy as the 2.5 FWD model, which is where I spend most of my time, and the 8-speed wet DCT in the Veloster N application got praise for sporty shifting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I need the turbo's power for the towing so that is what I am getting regardless.

If the DCT is jerky on a test drive then guess I will not buy a SC, simple as that. I will say the MT review is not encouraging :cautious: Responsive but rough might still be an acceptable trade off as its only noticable at low speeds, similar to a standard manual transmission where creeping around in 1st gear can be annyoning.

However DCTs are getting better all the time, my brother's Porsche has one (PDK wet clutch) and the new C8 has one (once again wet clutch). In theory its a superior way to change gears. However anyone interested in off road driving should stick with the regular automatic as its better for slow speed crawling and uphill tasks.

As for the AWD vs FWD mileage I bet it depends on how often the system switches to AWD. For example my brother had a VW Golf R - it would only engage the rear wheels if system detected front wheel slip. So it was FWD 90% of the time and only AWD 10% of the time. For track use he got an aftermarket controller which locked the car into AWD full time. Of course on track mileage was not a concern, it was all about ultimate grip and handling.

For towing I assume you want the system locked in AWD too. I thought I read when in "sport" mode that means AWD = on, plus there is a "lock" button in the center console which might be to engage AWD as needed. Compared to my current Dakota which averages 11 MPG when towing anything should be an improvement. I'd would be happy to get 15-17 dragging my boat. Fuel tank size is also a concern since a small tank will reduce range significantly when towing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I need the turbo's power for the towing so that is what I am getting regardless.
The 2.5 w/ the traditional automatic still does 3.5K trailer if I remember right, which is already quite a bit for a small vehicle. This is a 3.3K lb trailer (empty anyway):
710

SC doesn't come with a trailer brake controller from what I read, so you'd need that to even be allowed to tow that trailer in most states legally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
If there is one thing I've learned from towing over the last 20 years - get the BIGGEST engine you can. There is a massive difference between "can tow" and "tows well". My old Ranger was rated to tow around 5,000lbs and my Dakota is closer to 7,000. My boat is only in the 2,500 range but the ease at which Dakota pulls it made my old Ranger seem like a joke. I also towed with a Ram diesel and it acted like the boat wasn't even there due to all the torque.

Don't forget frontal area which Hyundai has not released yet. Moving weight is one thing, but the wind resistance is a whole different ball game. A trailer like the one above is basically a parachute in terms of aero. No way a SC could haul that at highway speeds for any length of time without overheating the engine or the transmission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I would not worry about the DCT. I've viewed all the drive reviews on Kias and Hyundais with this transmission and the reviewers raved about it. DO NOT compare the old Ford dry clutch with this wet clutch technology. I've had three cars with Wet DCT's (GTI, C8, Porsche turbo) and they've all been fabulous. It's all about the programming and the Hyundai unit seems pretty dialed in...

Watch and listen for a good DCT review in the Veloster..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
No way a SC could haul that at highway speeds for any length of time without overheating the engine or the transmission.
Should be able to monitor that easy enough and adjust speed accordingly, but since we're discussing 2.5 vs 2.5T and their respective transmissions, I don't think there's any evidence that the wet DCT has more cooling capacity than the traditional automatic the 2.5 has. Unless they have supplemental coolers, they should both just be using the same radiator up front which are probably going to be about the same size since the "mouth" opening for it is the same size.

Personally, if I were towing that beast, Texas is luckily mostly flat and I'd be going no more than 55mph one way or another since as you say its a parachute and fuel economy would really suffer. It usually doesn't add a huge amount of time to a trip and gives you peace of mind when towing a lot of weight since your handling and braking are going to suffer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Should be able to monitor that easy enough and adjust speed accordingly
Hopefully the digital gauge cluster offers some towing specific displays like trans and oil temp. Normally all you get is engine coolant and sometimes oil pressure.

Also you can't judge cooling just from the radiator opening. For example my Dakota uses stacked coolers - an aux trans cooler is mounted in front of the standard radiator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I think for sure they'll have trans and oil temp sensors, although it may just be a dummy light rather than a gauge we'll have to see. Reason I say that is even their most basic dry clutch DCTs had a transmission temp sensor to shut down the vehicle when it got too hot, as a couple reviewers already figured out trying to use it slow-crawling offroad! ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
although it may just be a dummy light rather than a gauge we'll have to see.
I'm hopeful for a real gauge... OK a real digital gauge. Seems like this would be an advantage of having a digital dash - adding gauges is really just a matter of displaying data you already have, IE: trans temp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I'm hopeful for a real gauge... OK a real digital gauge. Seems like this would be an advantage of having a digital dash - adding gauges is really just a matter of displaying data you already have, IE: trans temp.
100%
That said, there are aftermarket options using a plug in the OBD port that transmits data to your phone. Too clunky to use every trip, but certainly an option when towing/hauling, etc. (I use DashCommand if anyone wants to see what I’m talking about, definitely available for iOS, assume Android as well.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yup, on my Miata I installed and android head unit and got a bluetooth OBDII device then installed Torque Pro. A million things can be displayed that the OEM unit or dash never had the ability to do and you can configure it with as many gauges as you like in different shapes/sizes/colors and several pages as well.

712


713
 

·
Registered
2012 Mini Cooper 2007 Honda CR-V 1968 IH Travelall 4X4
Joined
·
37 Posts
2.5L dual injected and torque converter SHIFTRONIC for me. Loved that combination on my 2012 Mini Cooper Hardtop and not a single issue in 10 tens of use. It wasn't fast (except in the corners), but was fun as heck to drive in Sport mode when the urge stuck me. I imagine the Santa Cruz with its' 2.5L will be as well. Slowing down in my active older years...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
That said, there are aftermarket options using a plug in the OBD port that transmits data to your phone.
I use a similar setup when I track my C7. Combined with Apple CarPlay it should even show up on the infotainment screen.
 

·
Registered
2012 Mini Cooper 2007 Honda CR-V 1968 IH Travelall 4X4
Joined
·
37 Posts
Liking the HP and Torque numbers of both engine versions offered. Those have been stated for all to see, but what I haven't seen yet is at what RPM those numbers are at.

Does anyone have the RPM's at which the peak HP and Torque are taken?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, based on this link and the Tuscon:


Diverse Smartstream Engine Family Line-up
The new Tucson offers both a Smartstream 2.5-liter, a direct-injected, and multi-port-injected gasoline engine as well as 1.6-liter, direct-injected, turbocharged hybrid, and plug-in hybrid powertrains. The new Smartstream 2.5-liter engine, with high-efficiency combustion, cooled EGR and an optimized ITMS cooling system, boasts 187 horsepower at 6,100 rpm and 178 lb.-ft. of torque at 4,000 rpm, with a targeted combined fuel economy of 28 mpg with front-wheel drive. This 2.5-liter engine works with 8-speed automatic transmission for excellent efficiency and acceleration.
 

·
Registered
2012 Mini Cooper 2007 Honda CR-V 1968 IH Travelall 4X4
Joined
·
37 Posts
Thanks, I clearly missed that...

How about the 2.5T? And what is the 2.5T pulling at 4,000RPM?
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top