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2022 SEL AWD * Non-Activity - SoCal
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Yeah, even my poor old 2003 Subaru Baja has a spin on oil filter for the tranny! Then again it has a spin on oil filter too and not an antique canister type like my brand new 2022 SC has.
My '68 International Travelall (which is almost considered farm equipment) had a toilet paper canister filter on it when I towed it home. Swapped that for a spin-on immediately. Toilet paper is too valuable!
 

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First off I have not been on this forum for a while. An oil leak issue is news to me, please direct me to that discussion. Kudos to soldthetaco, all of his posts are most relevant and highly recommended to follow. He is the original reason I follow this forum. My posts on the other hand are questionable. Im at 3500 miles and keeping it for another 50k at most, I’m driving it hard and trading it, it’s not my dream vehicle but I will maintain it better than most while owning it, fyi. At 2k I installed a hitch receiver w a 7 pin connector from Kia (an alignment hoist supporting the exhaust made the install so easy) along with motor oil, differential and transfer case fluid changes. I used redline 5w30 and 75w110, both are ester based synthetic oils with zdp. I occasionally tow a scag zero turn, 1300lb. on a 500lb. 6x10 aluminum trailer, henceforth the 75w110 gear oil. I have a 2.5T limited hi-trac. I traded a ridgeline, the v6 definitely towed better, btw, until. I installed the burger tuner, 2500miles, the oil was changed at 800/2000k miles, again with redline 5w30, not 0w30, I feel I “broke” and protected the engine enough at un boosted to install the tuner. I believe adding significantly increased HP (JB4) at a reasonable point during break in is best otherwise you are kinda breaking your engine in again when/if you add a boost tune. I purchase 93octane and use Lucas upper cylinder lubricant every tank since installing the JB4. The tuner for me is simple to use with my iPhone. Map 1 is a 2.5+ boost using 91 octane and map 2 is a 5+ boost with 93. Map1 is all I’ve used in sport mode, I am impressed with the map 1 tune. So far if I’m aware that a full sized diesel is wanting to coal roll me at a stop light, I can install map1 and school them on being rolled by a tuned 2.5turbo. Seriously, the JB4 is easy to use, highly effective and recommended even if you just need to tow ocassionally. It’s easy to switch between maps. I strongly suggest using 5w30 with this engine, 0w30 is a manufacturer mileage game w the EPA, especially if you add some turbo boost. If anyone has heard of or have ideas about a cat back exhaust system that lowers the exhaust tone and increases flow please comment.
 

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2022 Limited Blue Stone
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Wow i didn't think the DCT fluid would be that dark maybe I should be changing mine early as well....
I, too, wonder why it’s so dang dark, if it’s fine, or if I should go request it be changed when the time comes, contrary to the manual.
According the car care nut, a dealer or mechanic should bill the customer max half an hour per drain and fill item, so all 3 fluids shouldn't be more than 1.5 hours of labor, not sure how much but, at $150/hr that's about $225 just for labor, parts are going to cost around another $100.

I honestly think that if you want to do it yourself there might be benefit, but paying someone else to do it defeats the purpose of preventive maintenance (to save money in the long run).
Quoting the video, I too agree that first fluid change should be done at most 30k miles and after that it can be pushed to every 50k or so. So for paid service I'd do that interval instead
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
That was my first thought. The clutch wear has to go somewhere, but you'd think the filter would catch it even at the microscopic level. Hard to believe the filter would not be serviceable in a clutch wear lubricant situation.
maybe the engineer thinks that's okay.
The gear oil does lubrication and cooling and now I know also absorbs all kinds of junk in the enclosed system.
The actual "gear shifting" or clutch engagement is done by another fluid system, the DCT control fluid.
Thus, even though the gear oil is degraded with clutch material, as long as the control fluid is good, shifting quality shouldn't really suffer. Maybe that's why they think that putting a better/serviceable filter is not necessary, dumping the fluid when dirty is good enough
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
First off I have not been on this forum for a while. An oil leak issue is news to me, please direct me to that discussion. Kudos to soldthetaco, all of his posts are most relevant and highly recommended to follow. He is the original reason I follow this forum. My posts on the other hand are questionable. Im at 3500 miles and keeping it for another 50k at most, I’m driving it hard and trading it, it’s not my dream vehicle but I will maintain it better than most while owning it, fyi. At 2k I installed a hitch receiver w a 7 pin connector from Kia (an alignment hoist supporting the exhaust made the install so easy) along with motor oil, differential and transfer case fluid changes. I used redline 5w30 and 75w110, both are ester based synthetic oils with zdp. I occasionally tow a scag zero turn, 1300lb. on a 500lb. 6x10 aluminum trailer, henceforth the 75w110 gear oil. I have a 2.5T limited hi-trac. I traded a ridgeline, the v6 definitely towed better, btw, until. I installed the burger tuner, 2500miles, the oil was changed at 800/2000k miles, again with redline 5w30, not 0w30, I feel I “broke” and protected the engine enough at un boosted to install the tuner. I believe adding significantly increased HP (JB4) at a reasonable point during break in is best otherwise you are kinda breaking your engine in again when/if you add a boost tune. I purchase 93octane and use Lucas upper cylinder lubricant every tank since installing the JB4. The tuner for me is simple to use with my iPhone. Map 1 is a 2.5+ boost using 91 octane and map 2 is a 5+ boost with 93. Map1 is all I’ve used in sport mode, I am impressed with the map 1 tune. So far if I’m aware that a full sized diesel is wanting to coal roll me at a stop light, I can install map1 and school them on being rolled by a tuned 2.5turbo. Seriously, the JB4 is easy to use, highly effective and recommended even if you just need to tow ocassionally. It’s easy to switch between maps. I strongly suggest using 5w30 with this engine, 0w30 is a manufacturer mileage game w the EPA, especially if you add some turbo boost. If anyone has heard of or have ideas about a cat back exhaust system that lowers the exhaust tone and increases flow please comment.
thank you sir, here is the oil leak. I've definitely contemplated using a higher viscosity oil. I agree, these days OEMs try so hard to eke out a tiny big of mpg at the expense of longevity and reliability. Do you get 5W-30 for NOACK reason? 0W-30 in theory provides the same protection at working temp as the 5W-30, but 5W-30 is less volatile and thus less likely to contribute to carbon buildup on the intake valves. The SC is port injected too, so if that works as intended, there shouldn't be any carbon build up on the intake valves. This engine is relatively too new, and I haven't found much regarding oversea markets.

My Miata, per the US spec user manual, needs 0W-20, and the exact same car same engine, in Europe and Mexico, where I assume doesn't need to be CAFE compliant, all say 5W-30 oil.
Same way the 3rd gen Tacoma in the US requires 0W-20, but the exact same engine in an Australian spec highlander calls for 10w-30, granted Australia is pretty darn hot.

Now I just need to find the SC engine in other markets stating different oil spec to confirm what we all think it's true
 

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Isn't the turbo lubed by the engine oil? Does that factor into oil recommendations with regards to normally-aspirated vs. turbo?
 

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Isn't the turbo lubed by the engine oil? Does that factor into oil recommendations with regards to normally-aspirated vs. turbo?
Yes and yes. The turbo takes 0W-30 vs 0W-20 for the NA motor. Given the high heats a turbo generates 0W-40 might be better especially if your going to be hard on the engine (like towing or high boost applications).

On the whole 0W vs 5W debate, the 0W flows better at lower temps but 5W is rated down to -25 C (-13 F) so this comes down to what temps do you expect to encounter. Most articles I've read indicate the bigger spread between the two oil viscosity values (low to high) the less effective the oil is because it takes more additives to cover such a wide operating range.

Here are some examples using my C7. GM's LT1 (na) or LT4 (supercharged) 6.2l V8 recommend the following oil depending on use:
5W-30 = normal road car
15W-50 = track car
0W-40 = mixed use, road and track
Its assumed the 0W-40 recommendation was an effort to keep the fuel mileage up while still providing protection on track. As a reference my oil temps during street driving run about 180-200 degrees but on track it easily gets up to 260. The engine will go into limp mode if the oil hits 320. I'll be curious to log oil temps in the SC once I get one and start towing in FL's heat.
 

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As somebody else said above, not sure why you thought you needed to change all of these fluids so soon, or at all. The manual says they never need changed, simply "inspected". They are sealed systems, not designed to be opened - much like the transmission. And every time I've seen the rear differential opened on any vehicle, it does nothing but leak afterwards (think all those leaking pumpkin balls on old pickup trucks). Hope yours works out okay, but mine won't ever be opened until/unless they fail - I wouldn't be surprised if that opens up (no pun intended) warranty issues.

Screen shot from manual goes out to 104k.

Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Symmetry
 

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They are sealed systems, not designed to be opened - much like the transmission. And every time I've seen the rear differential opened on any vehicle, it does nothing but leak afterwards (think all those leaking pumpkin balls on old pickup trucks).
The diff and DCT both have fill and drain plugs, they were designed for easy fluid exchanges. How else do you think you inspect them? After inspect the fluid may need to be replaced, says so right in the chart you posted (cut off the critical part). In fact if these parts go underwater for any reason (like crossing a stream) you should replace the fluid.

Rectangle Font Line Material property Parallel


The only reason they would leak is if the washer on the bolts were damaged. We are not taking about unbolting a pumpkin here, things are much easier these days. Rear diff service is recommended and normally pretty easy (just stinky due the lube used): Is It Necessary to Change Your Car's Differential Fluid? - MotorBiscuit

Now the transmission is a different story... and your are correct - it is sealed and not user serviceable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
As somebody else said above, not sure why you thought you needed to change all of these fluids so soon, or at all. The manual says they never need changed, simply "inspected". They are sealed systems, not designed to be opened - much like the transmission. And every time I've seen the rear differential opened on any vehicle, it does nothing but leak afterwards (think all those leaking pumpkin balls on old pickup trucks). Hope yours works out okay, but mine won't ever be opened until/unless they fail - I wouldn't be surprised if that opens up (no pun intended) warranty issues.

Screen shot from manual goes out to 104k.

View attachment 4107
yep, I get paranoid too, that's why in 2 weeks time I'm going underneath to check for any leaks, all the washers are new and torqued to spec, they should be ok.
 

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The diff and DCT both have fill and drain plugs, they were designed for easy fluid exchanges. How else do you think you inspect them? After inspect the fluid may need to be replaced, says so right in the chart you posted (cut off the critical part). In fact if these parts go underwater for any reason (like crossing a stream) you should replace the fluid.

View attachment 4113

The only reason they would leak is if the washer on the bolts were damaged. We are not taking about unbolting a pumpkin here, things are much easier these days. Rear diff service is recommended and normally pretty easy (just stinky due the lube used): Is It Necessary to Change Your Car's Differential Fluid? - MotorBiscuit

Now the transmission is a different story... and your are correct - it is sealed and not user serviceable.
Pretty sure that doesn't apply to these fluids. And the manual clearly states that the differential is inspect only (unless submerged). But hey if you want to void your warranty, have at it. I'll stick with what the manual says. Regardless, there's absolutely no need to change them at 4k miles
 

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Awesome and informative post! The detailed descriptions and pictures make this an achievable task for nearly anyone that feels the need to give it a shot.

Having the wet clutch is similar to my experience with motorcycles. The oil was used in the motor and clutch basket assembly on a couple that I owned. Compared to my other bikes with a dry clutch I saw a big difference in how long the oil “appeared” to be clean and golden.
 

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Anyone know how to check the DCT Control Oil?
Thanks
You remove a bolt and insert a special tool, which is basically a simple dipstick to check the fluid level and fill as necessary. The vehicle has to be sitting level and you need to remove the air cleaner and duct work to access the DCT module. Its doesn't look difficult - you can get further detailed information by downloading the service manual here: Hyundai Service Website (subscription service)
 

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In this photo (OEM Fluid Part Numbers Lookup) it shows that our DCT has two different types of oil, meaning 2 fill and drain reservoirs.... but I can find no video or instructions detailing the 2nd type oil for the DCT? Even this thread only shows one drain plug associated with the DCT. What is the difference in the Gear oil and the Control oil? I am at about 9000k miles and my DCT has always had a pretty strong gear whine to it and I want to change the DCT oil to see if it helps it.
 

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The service manual has the procedure for the control oil, but it requires a dealer computer to cycle the system so its not considered owner level maintenance. Control oil is used to pressurize the clutch so it can shift gears - in a sense it replaces you physically pushing a clutch pedal. As such its not really a wear item, its not providing lubrication or cooling, its only used as hydraulic pressure. The manual says nothing about replacing it, which tells me its a "life-time" fluid. As long as the system remains sealed I see no reason to doubt that.

The actual gear oil inside the transmission, which does provide lubrication and cooling, is user serviceable and replacing it is described in this thread. Per the manual it should be replaced every 56k miles under severe usage.

This is what the service manual says in regards to DCT noise:
Rectangle Font Parallel Number Magenta


HF EOP = High Flow Electric Oil Pump which shown in post #15
 
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