Hyundai Santa Cruz Forum banner
81 - 96 of 96 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Regardless I don't trust dealers and can completely the work faster myself. Just a personal thing, nothing against Hyundai - its an excellent selling perk to know your new vehicle will be cared for 3 years.
Free oil changes are done by low paid entry techs who are judged on speed, not quality. My current truck came with oil changes included but I have done them all myself because I don't trust dealer service departments. I have seen evidence of cars serviced by dealers which recorded multiple oil changes under "free maintenance" and no evidence that any had ever been done. One truck took a cheater bar to remove the drain plug, so it may never have been drained. Now with canister filters you can't tell until you pull the element whether it was replaced or not, and why drain the oil to see at that point anyway?

Engine lube is just too important to me to trust the dealers. I change the oil in both my car and truck quickly and easily at home. As bonus I get to check them out and keep tabs on things, while knowing that this important maintenance was done properly.

I understand why most people will jump on the free service in their busy lives and in many cases it probably is fine. We all balance what we deal with and what trust others to handle and oil changes are messy and are - you know - work. You can see why someone might want to pass up on those. lol
 

·
Registered
2022 Limited Blue Stone
Joined
·
673 Posts
Discussion Starter · #82 ·
I understand why most people will jump on the free service in their busy lives and in many cases it probably is fine. We all balance what we deal with and what trust others to handle and oil changes are messy and are - you know - work. You can see why someone might want to pass up on those. lol
I think most people just aren't car enthusiasts enough to care too much. Same way I treat my refrigerator.


I once brought a friend, who only takes her car to dealership, to see how an oil change was done. It was an older car without no aero trim pieces and spin on filter.
It was literally just drain, swap filter, pour oil, done. And after that she told me that's something she could do. The reason she never did it was because in her mind she thought oil changes were very technical and only dealership professionals could do it correctly.

Also I showed her the cabin filter location and how to change it and she got super mad that the dealership charged her $70 dollars for that, which took less than 1 min that I did it in front of her.

As of right now, she still doesn't change her oil, citing too dirty and too much work, but she changes engine filters and cabin filters now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
True... but its not profitable work for the dealer unless they cut corners. Are the techs better then those at Quick Lube? I sure hope so. Is the dealer going to work harder to do it right? Well it is in thier best intrest given any warranty claims will be squarely in their court.

Regardless I don't trust dealers and can completely the work faster myself. Just a personal thing, nothing against Hyundai - its an excellent selling perk to know your new vehicle will be cared for 3 years. They only cover the standard/normal maintenance schedule and since I'll be towing I require more frequent service thus the value is somewhat lower.
Understand you don't trust the dealer... same here regarding the Quick Lube places.. I've have had some terrible experinces with Jiffy and Valvoline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
Also I showed her the cabin filter location and how to change it and she got super mad that the dealership charged her $70 dollars for that, which took less than 1 min that I did it in front of her.
Have someone show you a brake job and you'll never pay for that service either. If you can change a tire you can (at minimum) put on brake pads. Rotors can be more challenging just because caliper bolts tend to have really high torque values and get rusty so breaking them loose requires some creative solutions. I had to admit defeat on one of my vehicles and took it in to an independent mechanic.

The worse part on a DIY oil change is going to the auto parts store to recycle the oil. With gloves and a proper drain pan its not even that messy.

When in doubt fire up YouTube and check out Chris Fix - he has some great DIY videos. Obviously not SC specific info but gives you an idea of the generic steps. Mechanically most vehicles are the same. I've done brakes on maybe 5 different makes / models and the differences are minor.
 

·
Registered
2022 Sage Grey SC Ultimate
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
The only issue with brake jobs to me is when you have to replace calipers and bleed the system. I didn't mind doing that stuff when I was younger and brakes were simple hydraulic systems. But these days, with all the electronic parking brakes and ABS pumps (the old GMC trucks are FAMOUS for being a royal PITA to bleed if you get air in the ABS system), combined with my aching bones and blood thinners, I prefer to let someone else bust their knuckles. But when I was younger and cars were simpler ... brake jobs were nothing. Replaced many master cylinders in the driveway too.
 

·
Registered
2022 SEL AWD * Non-Activity
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
Is this showing the oil doesn't need to be changed until 6000 miles or 12 months or is that for some other maintenance?
Because my dealer gave that to me on purchase, I have to assume that is the schedule they are following with the 2022 Santa Cruz I bought.

Yes, you don't need to change your oil sooner than the dealer recommended schedule, but many people PREFER to follow what THEY think is best or better for the longevity of their vehicle. Personally I plan to do a first oil change on my non-turbo model at 2,000-2,500 miles and then let the dealer service plan do the second at 7,500/1 year. After that, I will simply follow the dealer schedule of every 7,500/1 year with the recommended full synthetic quality oil and OEM filter. My non-turbo isn't a race car or driven hard and parked hot repeatedly. It's a mild mannered daily driver that gets the job done.

Coming from the "old school" of building and running modified engines of all types in my younger years, I agree with what the typical Car Guy says about doing a first oil change early at about 500 miles to get all the initial wear break in material out of the system. Many people today think the modern materials, lubricants and filters don't require this as much as in the past. That seems to be what the automotive industry have adopted in their service plans.

I was surprised to see the 6,000 mile service on the turbo models on that handout. As pointed out above, the manual says 8,000. With a turbo I'd do an early 500 mile initial oil change and follow with 5,000 miles after that, especially if you are using your Santa Cruz and an adrenalin junky.

ADDED: Being that Hyundai gives you a +/-1,000 range for the complimentary service, you should be able to use the dealer service as soon as you turn past the 5,000 mile mark on the turbo models, assuming the handout I was given is current.

I'm guessing the "ELECTRIC" service is for electric cars and not the electrical system on ICE cars.
 

·
Registered
2022 SEL AWD * Non-Activity
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
The only issue with brake jobs to me is when you have to replace calipers and bleed the system. I didn't mind doing that stuff when I was younger and brakes were simple hydraulic systems. But these days, with all the electronic parking brakes and ABS pumps (the old GMC trucks are FAMOUS for being a royal PITA to bleed if you get air in the ABS system), combined with my aching bones and blood thinners, I prefer to let someone else bust their knuckles. But when I was younger and cars were simpler ... brake jobs were nothing. Replaced many master cylinders in the driveway too.
I do brake pads myself, but have a favorite technician do the 3-5 year brake fluid flush for me. The brakes always seem to feel better after that service by a professional too. I think that is because they tune up all the other brake related things like pedal, E-brake, etc... Worth every penny of the $100-$150 they generally charge for the flush service.
 

·
Registered
2022 SEL AWD * Non-Activity
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
Cabin filter change charges are the biggest ripoff in the world. Learn how to do that yourself and save the $$$.

Oil changes aren't for everyone and any quality dealer can be trusted for that. If it's as easy as posters are saying, then even the low level whipping boy mechanic can do it just fine. Do it yourself if you want (I do), but for those that aren't car people realize that you need tools, drain pan, rags, etc... AND have to transport the oil and used filter to a recycling center to dispose of it all properly. Plus you risk stained garage/driveways and the like; it's a messy job. Again, not for everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
my next change will be at 1.5k miles
and then 4k and every 4k I think, I want it to align with fuel additive injector cleaner schedule, which is every 4k miles treat 1 tank of gas
I forgot to do this one but I'll have the oil analysis done in the next couple of oil changes, it's definitely an overkill, the vast majority of people follow non-severe schedule and still drive 100k+ miles so 🤷‍♂️
What is the change interval per Hyundai? I know toyota is 5k for non synthetic and 10k for synthetic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
That's reasonable. It certainly justifies synthetic oil. If I were to do 4k mi, I would do the filter change every 2nd oil change.
Is that your plan?
This is my 3rd vehicle so most likely be less than 5000 miles a year. I plan to let Hyundai change it yearly given it is synthetic. I do same with my Jag F-Type with a yearly oil change. My Highlander used regular oil and was my go to vehicle for 16 years so did 2x yearly oil changes. Highlander was sold a week ago, sniff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
That's reasonable. It certainly justifies synthetic oil. If I were to do 4k mi, I would do the filter change every 2nd oil change.
Is that your plan?
Most oil filters have a built in restriction by-pass and reach restriction much quicker than air filters. When the filter reaches restriction it will allow unfiltered oil to be circulated through your engine. A cheap filter is better than restricted filter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Most oil filters have a built in restriction by-pass and reach restriction much quicker than air filters. When the filter reaches restriction it will allow unfiltered oil to be circulated through your engine. A cheap filter is better than restricted filter.
That's a good point. Then hyundai should not have such a long change interval @8k. Or they should change filters @ 4k intervals.
When i worked for a living I would take the natural gas vehicles (Honda civics) in for routine service. The non synthetic Oil look like it was just out of the bottle after 6000 hard miles. I was in awe!
I asked why are we changing the oil?
 

·
Registered
Black Limited
Joined
·
178 Posts
Most oil filters have a built in restriction by-pass and reach restriction much quicker than air filters. When the filter reaches restriction it will allow unfiltered oil to be circulated through your engine. A cheap filter is better than restricted filter.
Have seen these antique cartridge oil filters the SC have? :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
Then hyundai should not have such a long change interval @8k. Or they should change filters @ 4k intervals.
The severe maintence schedule calls for oil and filter changes at 5k or 6 months. I think most people drive in conditions that actually fall under the "severe" label. With that said synthetic oil has proven to survive in extended drain situations like 8-12k. Personally I feel oil and filters are cheap long term insurance for your engine so better to change more often then not enough, especially with a turbo.
 
81 - 96 of 96 Posts
Top