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Thank you. I'll keep an eye out for that sale, that would be a great deal. They look good and plenty bright in your video on your conversion thread.
You are very welcome. They are plenty bright; the video is AFTER doing a blackout treatment on the lights. (y)
 
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@SmoovC, it sounds like you are the one to tackle another lighting project that several people have mentioned: using the entire "Thor's Hammer" as a sequential turn signal. Any chance of that happening?
 

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@SmoovC, it sounds like you are the one to tackle another lighting project that several people have mentioned: using the entire "Thor's Hammer" as a sequential turn signal. Any chance of that happening?
I do have some ideas on how to make that work, and from a technical standpoint I do not think it would be that difficult. The reality is that the OEM parts for the SC are pretty much not available for purchase from Hyundai; at least that I have found. Logistically, I am not willing to sacrifice my OEM parts for mock-up, modification, fabrication and testing, as vehicle downtime would pose an inconvenience.
 
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I contacted the eBay seller and told him that one of the LED bulbs failed and he sent me a new set. So now I have an extra one just in case.
Same for me. After about 6 weeks with the J87 “no resistor needed” LED bulbs, one went bad. 2 days later, another one failed on the other side. Seems as if they don’t like cold weather. No response yet from seller.
 

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Same for me. After about 6 weeks with the J87 “no resistor needed” LED bulbs, one went bad. 2 days later, another one failed on the other side. Seems as if they don’t like cold weather. No response yet from seller.
Same here. Cold snap and got the dreaded warning and hyper flash turn signal. Bummer! What do you wind up doing?
 

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Same here. Cold snap and got the dreaded warning and hyper flash turn signal. Bummer! What do you wind up doing?
After I received a replacement set from the seller, two other bulbs failed. You could see some the leds were not turning on. I went ahead a purchased a new set from Amazon that had a cooling fan and they worked fine with no errors. But I could hear the fan noise inside the cabin, so I returned them. I purchased a another set, Im still waiting for delivery.
 

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I originally bought 4 bulbs, but installed only 2, to see how well they worked. I'm 0 for 2, but installed the "extra" 2 I had about 3 weeks ago. So far, so good. The seller responded and said a replacement set would be sent, but I have not received them yet. With one failing, I thought it was just a bad egg. With 2/2 failing and the other reports here on the forum, I'm having my doubts about the application of the J87 bulbs, where the original incandescents/halogens seem to last MUCH longer. I'll likely keep the two working ones in for now, and replace the two other halogens with the J87 replacements when they arrive, but don't have much hope all of them will last through the winter. I'll probably either go back to the stock halogens or pay up and do SmoovC's upgrade (A Full Rear LED Conversion That Works: With No Errors). Although it seems to work well, I'm just not thrilled about having to have 2 external load resistors per side.
 

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I originally bought 4 bulbs, but installed only 2, to see how well they worked. I'm 0 for 2, but installed the "extra" 2 I had about 3 weeks ago. So far, so good. The seller responded and said a replacement set would be sent, but I have not received them yet. With one failing, I thought it was just a bad egg. With 2/2 failing and the other reports here on the forum, I'm having my doubts about the application of the J87 bulbs, where the original incandescents/halogens seem to last MUCH longer. I'll likely keep the two working ones in for now, and replace the two other halogens with the J87 replacements when they arrive, but don't have much hope all of them will last through the winter. I'll probably either go back to the stock halogens or pay up and do SmoovC's upgrade (A Full Rear LED Conversion That Works: With No Errors). Although it seems to work well, I'm just not thrilled about having to have 2 external load resistors per side.
The first one failed after 6-7 weeks. The seller sent me a new set, but then 2 failed at the same time after 9 weeks of use. So I just gave up on them and started to search for another set. I don't mind if I have to replace them every other year, but 6-9 weeks is a bit too much. Maybe they are getting too hot, that is why I tried the ones that I got from Amazon that have a cooling fan. They did work, but the fan noise was a bit too annoying for me.

I hope you have better luck with them.
 

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I'll probably either go back to the stock halogens or pay up and do SmoovC's upgrade (A Full Rear LED Conversion That Works: With No Errors). Although it seems to work well, I'm just not thrilled about having to have 2 external load resistors per side.
TBH, I am not sure why anyone would be opposed to installing quality, properly designed load resistors? I can certainly understand not wanting to install cheap ones with connectors that are not waterproof; such as the these:
Circuit component Passive circuit component Electronic component Amber Cable


It seems obvious that the bulb failures people are experiencing are a direct result of the enemy of all electronics: heat. Properly designed and installed external load resistors facilitate heat dissipation outside of the light housing and away from the bulb; resulting in longer life for both components.

Case and point: I installed a VLEDS full LED conversion in my wife's car when new, in 2015. This included low beam, high beam, fog lights, front turn signal, front park, rear turn signal (rear park & brake were Factory LED), reverse and license plate; as well as trunk and glove box. With just over 55,000 miles, not a single bulb element or resistor has failed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
I originally bought 4 bulbs, but installed only 2, to see how well they worked. I'm 0 for 2, but installed the "extra" 2 I had about 3 weeks ago. So far, so good. The seller responded and said a replacement set would be sent, but I have not received them yet. With one failing, I thought it was just a bad egg. With 2/2 failing and the other reports here on the forum, I'm having my doubts about the application of the J87 bulbs, where the original incandescents/halogens seem to last MUCH longer. I'll likely keep the two working ones in for now, and replace the two other halogens with the J87 replacements when they arrive, but don't have much hope all of them will last through the winter. I'll probably either go back to the stock halogens or pay up and do SmoovC's upgrade (A Full Rear LED Conversion That Works: With No Errors). Although it seems to work well, I'm just not thrilled about having to have 2 external load resistors per side.
Or the extreme red kit X 2
I have them on over 4 months now, been through temp range from 20s to 100s F, absolutely no issue.
No resistor needed, just need to cut the zip ties of original wiring, re-arranging and orienting where the sockets are going to fit when you put it back together.
the sockets and all the connecting components are just suspended by the wires, so for added support I wrapped the wires in electrical tape. So far so good.

the only downside is cost, maybe wait for their 20% off sale
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
TBH, I am not sure why anyone would be opposed to installing quality, properly designed load resistors?
I think the selling point of VLEDS resistors is that they can be easily removed. Their resistors and the duo tap kit are separated and modularized. If you end up not going to need resistors, just unplug the resistors and leave the duo tap kit in place and seal the connector socket when reverting back to stock halogen.
 

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I think the selling point of VLEDS resistors is that they can be easily removed.
While that may be an added bonus, the biggest advantage is performance and long life; as I stated: "external load resistors facilitate heat dissipation outside of the light housing and away from the bulb; resulting in longer life for both components."
 
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so for added support I wrapped the wires in electrical tape.
For automotive applications, (especially exterior) I would recommend Tesa tape; as opposed to electrical tape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
For automotive applications, (especially exterior) I would recommend Tesa tape; as opposed to electrical tape.
thanks, I didn't know they make so many different adhesive/material choices for those tapes
 

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Ordered different LEDs today. Had to payup a bit but we'll see how this set (#3) goes.

those are the ones that I ordered a couple of weeks ago. They do work and you don’t get any errors, but I could hear the fan noise inside the cabin. The fan starts operating when the LED reach a certain temperature. For me, after holding the brake for around 5-7 seconds, I could hear the cooling fans. I returned them. Let me know if you experience the same thing.
 

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TBH, I am not sure why anyone would be opposed to installing quality, properly designed load resistors? I can certainly understand not wanting to install cheap ones with connectors that are not waterproof; such as the these:
...
Case and point: I installed a VLEDS full LED conversion in my wife's car when new, in 2015. This included low beam, high beam, fog lights, front turn signal, front park, rear turn signal (rear park & brake were Factory LED), reverse and license plate; as well as trunk and glove box. With just over 55,000 miles, not a single bulb element or resistor has failed.
No issue with doing it right the first time. My concern is now I will have four resistor modules taped to the truck, twice the number of wires, and pricey bulbs - all new potential failure points. Wires to chafe, tape to let go, while paying a premium to get it all done. My earlier post was not in opposition to installing quality load resistors, but paying a premium for an installation that's not as clean as what it was replacing.

Glad to hear your complete install on you're wife's car is successful at 55k miles - which means the LEDs are at least as good as the stock halogens in terms of longevity. I'm sure there's no comparison in terms of brightness and response. I'm just having a hard time getting my head around $35 bulbs + $25 resistors * 4 = $240 for better brake/turn bulbs.
 

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I would be much more concerned about all of that heat build up inside the light housing and at the Factory light socket, and the potential liability for light bulbs that seem to fail every few weeks; that would make me nervous as ****.

I get it: you are looking for a cheap and simple solution to a complex problem, and hoping inexpensive parts will defy the laws of physics. Reality: there is no free lunch.
 

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I would be much more concerned about all of that heat build up inside the light housing and at the Factory light socket
Not sure what you mean by “all that heat buildup”. Typical incandescents dissipate about 75%+ of their power as heat. A typical 1156 bulb that consumes 27 watts will be dissipating 75% of that as heat, which is about 20 Watts. This is the factory configuration, which the truck was designed to. Worst case at 12V, a 27W bulb will draw 2.25A, which has to be compensated for with a load resistor when using an LED as a replacement. Agreed, pulling the load resistor away from the socket and using the truck body as a heat sink can only help from a heat perspective, but the truck was designed to dump a lot of heat from the incandescents it was designed for. My opinion is that the remote resistor has the potential to create more problems with longevity and reliability than the heat "problems" it solves. Sounds like you have a different opinion, which is fine and good and I won't berate you for that.

I get it: you are looking for a cheap and simple solution to a complex problem, and hoping inexpensive parts will defy the laws of physics. Reality: there is no free lunch.
Not trying to defy physics here as you indicate. Not even looking for a cheap solution to a problem that doesn't exist. I think we've proven that some of the LEDs available with internal load resistors aren't ready for this application yet. I'm glad you found a solution that works, and works for you and others who are willing to spend lots of cash for a bulb improvement. Thanks for posting your solution and making it available.
 

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When I mentioned "all that heat build up", I was referring to the LEDs w/ internal load resistors; not standard incandescent bulbs. I thought that was readily apparent; I suppose I could have made that abundantly clear. From this thread and reviews on AMZ & eBay, it is obvious the bulbs with internal load resistors cannot handle the heat generated upon themselves, and tend to self-destruct in fairly short order.

I understand it is your opinion that "the remote resistor has the potential to create more problems with longevity and reliability than the heat "problems" it solves." Everyone is entitled to their opinion; there is no disputing that. I think where we differ is that I possess actual, verified real world experience, on multiple vehicles, over multiple years, that they are in fact long-lasting and reliable.

You are correct: at a total of $200.00 at the time of writing, this is not a cheap solution for the initial outlay of parts. But in the grand scheme of things, price alone isn't the only consideration here. Factor in time spent troubleshooting, contacting vendors, swapping bulbs and general frustration with lesser products; and I think that the product is priced accordingly if one places value on their time. It is a "one and done" conversion, that works right the first time.

I hope you find a solution that works for your application that fits your needs and budget. :) (y)
 
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