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Just did a 1.5K mile road trip with the SC, had a blast. Took the truck from the midwest to the outer banks, ferry ride and all. Lost track of the number of people that asked me what type of car it was!

Anywho - the grill! For the automotively inclined, what is the metallic/filter looking thing behind the front grill? Is there any risk of damaging it with say: a strong water hose, brush, etc.? (Or would I be better off using an air-hose or something?)

The reason I ask is, that vent is currently a graveyard of dragon flies and bugs. Took it through a car wash already, but given the distance between the front grill and the vent, it had little-no impact on it.

I can post photos of what I'm talking about, if it's not immediately clear, but I'm ashamed of how many bugs are in there currently.
 

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Radiator? Turbo intercooler? Both would look similar to below and be located directly behind the grille and in front of the engine.

2000



If so should be no problem to blast it with water or get in there with a soft brush. The metal fins are thin (and sharp) so don't be super aggressive. Once the bugs are dry they should come off pretty easily. And yes you want to keep this part clean, if it gets really clogged with bugs you can overheat the engine (been there done that).
 

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A/C condenser? Whatever it is, spray it with Simple Green, let it sit for awhile, hose it off.
 

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Once the bugs are dry they should come off pretty easily.
I usually recommend the opposite when dealing with bugs, really soak those suckers and their bodies break down. Especially for paint if you have a ton of bugs, you can first just blast it with the narrow nozzle with your hose to get off the majority (won't hurt anything), but then for everything still sticking and all their glue-like body liquids from splatting just grab some giant microfibers soaking wet and lay them on the areas to soak for a bit. Then get a foam cannon and blast the whole vehicle, and by the time you come to wipe them off with fresh small microfiber washing towels or mitts they should wipe right off, and the soap is a good lubricant to avoid scratches.

If you have a house with water and not apartment, I'd avoid those car wash places and hand wash. You can skip over quite a bit of the below video on a brand new car, but he has some tips below about foam canons and wax.
 

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@JASmith for painted surfaces I agree (y) get them off ASAP, but when stuck in the cooling fins if they are fresh and squishy I find water just forces them further into places where you can never get them out. Once dry you can just brush or blast them off. Then I do what @ToadVine does: clean up the residue with Simple Green.
 

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Use caution when cleaning intercoolers, radiators, condensors, and other aluminum parts (there are lots of them under the hood) with Simple Green. From Simple Green's website:

"...aluminum is a soft metal that easily corrodes with unprotected exposure to water. The aqueous-base and alkalinity of Simple Green All-Purpose Cleaner can accelerate the corrosion process.

Therefore, contact times for unprotected or unpainted aluminum surfaces should be kept as brief as the job will allow - never for more than 10 minutes. Large cleaning jobs should be conducted in smaller-area stages to achieve lower contact time. Rinsing after cleaning should always be extremely thorough - paying special attention to flush out cracks and crevices to remove all Simple Green product residues."
 

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Use caution when cleaning intercoolers, radiators, condensors, and other aluminum parts (there are lots of them under the hood) with Simple Green.
Interesting... thanks. I've always rinsed it off quickly. I've used Simple Green to clean aluminum wheels and brake parts for years, its cuts thru brake dust really well.
 

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I've been successfully cleaning engines with it for decades myself. Aluminum wheels are protected because they're painted.

A few years ago, we began experiencing corrosion issues on aluminized parts at work. The issue was traced to the use of Simple Green to remove oil and fingerprints left behind during the manufacture of some products we manufacture. The workers were wiping the panels with diluted Simple Green, but there was no good way to rinse the panels afterward.
 

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Just did a 1.5K mile road trip with the SC, had a blast. Took the truck from the midwest to the outer banks, ferry ride and all. Lost track of the number of people that asked me what type of car it was!

Anywho - the grill! For the automotively inclined, what is the metallic/filter looking thing behind the front grill? Is there any risk of damaging it with say: a strong water hose, brush, etc.? (Or would I be better off using an air-hose or something?)

The reason I ask is, that vent is currently a graveyard of dragon flies and bugs. Took it through a car wash already, but given the distance between the front grill and the vent, it had little-no impact on it.

I can post photos of what I'm talking about, if it's not immediately clear, but I'm ashamed of how many bugs are in there currently.
what was your avg MPG's on that trip? Guessing around 24/25? thanks!
 

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Interesting... thanks. I've always rinsed it off quickly. I've used Simple Green to clean aluminum wheels and brake parts for years, its cuts thru brake dust really well.
Simple Green just depends usually on how much you dilute it. Undiluted its crazy strong and can etch for sure. I generally just stick with soap though, and I have a electric pressure sprayer that's not super strong, particularly with the 45o attachment.
 

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Simple Green just depends usually on how much you dilute it. Undiluted its crazy strong and can etch for sure. I generally just stick with soap though, and I have a electric pressure sprayer that's not super strong, particularly with the 45o attachment.
I would add for the paint, once you get the critters off of it, use one of the "new" ceramic waxes. We are in "bee" country in SO CA... so I get tons hitting the hood/radiators. At least for the paint, I can now simply rinse them off. Pressure washer for sure on the other stuff. You do have to apply the wax again, normally after every wash. Spray and wipe it off.
 

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A little known trick for removing bugs on the painted surfaces is to use a used Dryer sheet. Works like magic, with no abrasive damage. Everyone I've turned on to this trick has been amazed..
 

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Dryer sheets are good for breaking down fibers in clothing, too - that's how they make them softer. I stopped using dryer sheets years ago and was amazed at how much longer my clothes started to last and how much more absorbent bath towels became without all that damaged, coated fibers. :)
 
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