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2022 Blue Stone Limited
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I ready to put fuel in my SC for the first time. Just wondering if anyone uses regular octane fuel.
The manual say 91 octane for the turbo engine.
Thanks
Use regular fuel 87 octane

page 1-5 manual says
Unleaded Fuel Only
FUEL REQUIREMENTS
Your new vehicle is designed to perform optimally using unleaded fuel having an octane number ((R+M)/2) of 87 (Research Octane Number 91) or higher. (Do not use methanol blended fuels)
Your new vehicle is designed to obtain maximum performance with UNLEADED FUEL, as well as minimize exhaust emissions and spark plug fouling.
 

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I ready to put fuel in my SC for the first time. Just wondering if anyone uses regular octane fuel.
The manual say 91 octane for the turbo engine.
Thanks
You’re reading it wrong

it’s regular (87) not 91 - RON is 91 thats the standard Europe and countries outside of North America uses… Canada and US used PON ( mix between RON and MON, hence ((R+M)/2) is 87

The manual states 87 - adding premium fuel does nothing for the Santa Cruz. 2.5T
 

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22 SC Limited • Hampton Gray
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502 Posts
I can attest that premium fuel does nothing, like GTAcruz states. The only gas that improves mileage slightly is “ethanol free”, if you can find it. But ethanol free gas also costs more…and the extra cost vs better mileage is about a break even.
 

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2023 LTD AWD - Sage Gray | Pittsburgh, PA
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I ready to put fuel in my SC for the first time. Just wondering if anyone uses regular octane fuel.
The manual say 91 octane for the turbo engine.
Thanks
I would also make sure you are buying from Tier 1 gas places such as Costco/Sams Club, Shell, Exxon, Citgo, Chevron to name a few.

Check out the list and Tier 1 gas goes a long way for your vehicle. Just like regular oil changes. Anything to keep the car healthy


Cruz On,
H
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I only use Shell fuel. I have had many forced induction engines and they all required 91 or better. Higher Octane helps with pre ignition in high compression engines. Since posting I researched our engine specs for the 2.5 and 2.5T, the normally aspirated ratio is 13 psi and the turbo engine is only 10.5 psi. Odd.
I think I'm going with medium grade. And higher octane will not foul spark plugs or change emission.
B
 

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2022 Santa Cruz Limited, Sage Gray
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I only use Shell fuel. I have had many forced induction engines and they all required 91 or better. Higher Octane helps with pre ignition in high compression engines. Since posting I researched our engine specs for the 2.5 and 2.5T, the normally aspirated ratio is 13 psi and the turbo engine is only 10.5 psi. Odd.
I think I'm going with medium grade. And higher octane will not foul spark plugs or change emission.
B
A turbo or forced induction does not always equate to using 91 octane.
For example, look at Mazda's 2.5T engine which also calls for 87 octane (while it has the ability to increase power on 91, which the Hyundai engine does not). In fact Mazda engineers have stated that they would love to have their Skyactiv-X engine run on worse than 85 octane if possible, except that is a one off.

The manual calls for 87, use 87.

Unless you throw a tune on the car to actually utilize the higher octane you are quite literally burning money for no return.
 

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2022 Santa Cruz SEL Premium, Blue Stone
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I've been active in several motorcycle forums over the years, and this is a very frequent discussion topic. The Santa Cruz manual recommends 87 octane and that's what I use here exclusively. And always Top-Tier brands. Higher octane probably won't hurt anything, but the benefit is doubtful.

Many who know better than I suggest that we should think of higher octane as adding increased resistance to combustion. So unless we have higher compression engines that require it (which we don't in the Cruz), it doesn't seem to justify the increased cost which around here can be around $.80/gal more.

I am not an engineer, but this seems to be a very common and well-regarded view on octane. Just throwing it out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm a retired TurboJet Flight Engineer and Forest you speak the truth. I think you mean resistance to pre ignition or "knock". Lower octane will ignite the fuel prior to the piston being on the power stroke. Caused by low octane and high pressure.
You are correct if you don't need the higher octane it's a waste of money. Again the 2.5 turbo has only a 10.5 compression. I prefer 89 if available.
My $.02 worth.
 

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2022 Santa Cruz Limited, Sage Gray
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I've been active in several motorcycle forums over the years, and this is a very frequent discussion topic. The Santa Cruz manual recommends 87 octane and that's what I use here exclusively. And always Top-Tier brands. Higher octane probably won't hurt anything, but the benefit is doubtful.

Many who know better than I suggest that we should think of higher octane as adding increased resistance to combustion. So unless we have higher compression engines that require it (which we don't in the Cruz), it doesn't seem to justify the increased cost which around here can be around $.80/gal more.

I am not an engineer, but this seems to be a very common and well-regarded view on octane. Just throwing it out there.
Likewise on the motorcycle side, I road race motorcycles and it's a common discussion. You're almost right on saying "higher octane as adding increased resistance to combustion". In fact higher octane simply makes the fuel more resistant to knock, at least with the kind of gas you get at the pump (not counting speciality racing fuels or other non-standard fuels).
 

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Limited purchased 8/2022
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These threads are always fun reading, like the tires threads. And Apple vs. Android. Back in the day, my father-in-law, rest in peace, always filled his cars with premium fuel and was a big proponent of “you get what you pay for.” Nothing the kids said would change his view. Same as it ever was.
 

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I only use Shell fuel. I have had many forced induction engines and they all required 91 or better. Higher Octane helps with pre ignition in high compression engines. Since posting I researched our engine specs for the 2.5 and 2.5T, the normally aspirated ratio is 13 psi and the turbo engine is only 10.5 psi. Odd.
I think I'm going with medium grade. And higher octane will not foul spark plugs or change emission.
B
I'm with you on that. I have been using Shell for 30 years. No ethanol crap in this gas. The additives a
I only use Shell fuel. I have had many forced induction engines and they all required 91 or better. Higher Octane helps with pre ignition in high compression engines. Since posting I researched our engine specs for the 2.5 and 2.5T, the normally aspirated ratio is 13 psi and the turbo engine is only 10.5 psi. Odd.
I think I'm going with medium grade. And higher octane will not foul spark plugs or change emission.
B
I only use Shell fuel. I have had many forced induction engines and they all required 91 or better. Higher Octane helps with pre ignition in high compression engines. Since posting I researched our engine specs for the 2.5 and 2.5T, the normally aspirated ratio is 13 psi and the turbo engine is only 10.5 psi. Odd.
I think I'm going with medium grade. And higher octane will not foul spark plugs or change emission.
B
I am with you on that one. I have been using Shell gasoline for over 30 years. Before that I was purchasing whatever and not really thinking about it.
Someone mentioned Shell to me as stated that I would see a difference in mileage, pep and it would keep the injectors from mucking up. I did not believe them but gave it a go and by the fourth tank and the first thing I noticed was a difference in mileage. I guess it must be the additives as after the 5th tank I never looked back. I use the 94 Octane in my smaller machines like my snow blower, weed whacker, lawnmower, Sea-Doo.
Some people may say that gas is gas, Whatever.... Go ahead and use your crap gas then!
 

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I am with you on that one. I have been using Shell gasoline for over 30 years. Before that I was purchasing whatever and not really thinking about it.
Someone mentioned Shell to me as stated that I would see a difference in mileage, pep and it would keep the injectors from mucking up. I did not believe them but gave it a go and by the fourth tank and the first thing I noticed was a difference in mileage. I guess it must be the additives as after the 5th tank I never looked back. I use the 94 Octane in my smaller machines like my snow blower, weed whacker, lawnmower, Sea-Doo.
Some people may say that gas is gas, Whatever.... Go ahead and use your crap gas then!
Shell uses “Top Tier” cleaning additives, as recommended by most car manufacturers- this is keeping your injectors from mucking up.

Shell only sells their Shell V-Power® NiTRO+ 93 octane in BC and Alberta and 91 everywhere which is ethanol free - mid grade and regular have ethanol
 

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Feel free to waste money on higher test if it makes you feel better. Unless you encounter knocking under high loads/high temps there is no reason to run anything but 87. Hyundai built the engine to run on that octane, so it will not run better or get better mileage on higher test. My ancient Ranger needed 89 when towing in FL during the summer with the A/C on, however modern engines have much better spark control to the point that knocking / pinging is a thing of the past.
 

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SEL Premium Hampton Grey
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The engine will adjust timing based on the fuel to a small degree, so you will see very small performance gains by using premium gas. When looking for $/mi, the gains no where near match the added cost. The very small performance gains is the only reason to use premium over regular in this engine.
 
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