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2020 Kia Stinger GT2
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
1. After our just-finished 2500-mile road trip, I've decided the steering wheel absolutely sucks. Many of us like to keep our right hands at about the 4-5 o'clock position on the wheel, but the shape of the spokes makes that impossible. And the place it forces me to put my hands feels awkward and is uncomfortable after driving a while.

Worse yet, in that area (where it is outlined in silver trim), there is a sharp ridge on the inside rear of the wheel that absolutely kills my hands after an hour or two. It seems to fall right in the last joint of my fingers and makes me feel like I have arthritis after driving for a while. And there's no real comfortable alternative position to get away from that ridge. Why in the heck they made it that way is a mystery to me. A nice round profile would have been much more user-friendly.

2. Hyundai engineered this engine for the highway. At 80 mph, the 2.5T engine is turning a lazy 2000 rpm. Unfortunately, that doesn't make it get 30 mpg, but it does keep it in its sweet spot for easy cruising but still ready for action. The little truck is a sleeper, spooling up from 60 for brisk passing on 2-lane highways. And like many turbo motors, it seems to accelerate stronger at smaller throttle openings. If you just feed it in instead of flooring it, it pulls hard, because smaller throttle openings force the intake air to mover faster as the engine sucks it in.

3. This isn't news, but the truck rides like a luxury car on the highway. I couldn't really ask for a better, more comfy ride on the open interstate. It's not floaty at all, and it handles like a sporty car while delivering a really smooth ride. On our return trip the bed was loaded to the gills with luggage, odds and ends, and some really heavy containers. Probably a total of 500lb. Didn't affect the ride or handling at all. Or the gas mileage.

I don't like everything about this truck, but there's more good than bad.
 

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2022 SEL AWD * Non-Activity - SoCal
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I saw 100+ mph passes on several occasions. Don't scold me...
We won't scold you, but the Hyundai service center might. I had one of the new Turbo VW Beetles and used to take it up to 110mph all the time. One day when I was bored and feeling stupid I decided to see if I could make the 60 mile run back from my ranch house at over 100mph the whole way (odd hours without traffic). I know STUPID! I was doing good, driving safely when others cars were near and watching for highway patrols. Suddenly out of no where a CHP was right beside my drivers door staring at me and shaking his head (never saw where he came from). I thought for sure I was busted. He motioned with his hand to slow it down, so I backed off quickly as he slowed down with me to about 65mpg. Suddenly he gave me a thumbs up and sped off at about 120mph and existed the next offramp. Go figure? My Turbo VW Beetle license plate was TURBIE and I won't state here what the license plate frame said, but I think he got a kick out of it.

Fast forward to my next VW dealer service pickup. The service girl handed me my key fob and said here's your race car back. I smiled and asked her what she meant. She said, you know your driving habits are recorded on the computer don't you? Oops! 馃檭
 

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2022 Limited Blue Stone
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Out in the wilds of Arizona, flat areas of 2-lane encourage hooligan passing maneuvers, and the truck is a fun co-conspirator. I saw 100+ mph passes on several occasions. Don't scold me - if I'm in the oncoming lane, I want out of it as soon as possible, and speed gets me there. (What's the statute of limitations on speeding anyway?)
yeah, 2-lane highway, where one has to move to the on-coming traffic is in practice "immune" from speeding citation. It's safer that way when one quickly passes and merges back, and if you actually get a ticket, explain that to the judge and the ticket will be dismissed most likely.
 

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2020 Kia Stinger GT2
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486 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah, 2-lane highway, where one has to move to the on-coming traffic is in practice "immune" from speeding citation. It's safer that way when one quickly passes and merges back, and if you actually get a ticket, explain that to the judge and the ticket will be dismissed most likely.
I hope I never have to talk to the judge!
 

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2022 Sage Grey SC Ultimate
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"Your honor, there was a vehicle about 3 miles ahead of me, I was just trying to get around him before there was oncoming traffic." I mean, it MIGHT work. :p
 

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1. After our just-finished 2500-mile road trip, I've decided the steering wheel absolutely sucks. Many of us like to keep our right hands at about the 4-5 o'clock position on the wheel, but the shape of the spokes makes that impossible. And the place it forces me to put my hands feels awkward and is uncomfortable after driving a while.

Worse yet, in that area (where it is outlined in silver trim), there is a sharp ridge on the inside rear of the wheel that absolutely kills my hands after an hour or two. It seems to fall right in the last joint of my fingers and makes me feel like I have arthritis after driving for a while. And there's no real comfortable alternative position to get away from that ridge. Why in the heck they made it that way is a mystery to me. A nice round profile would have been much more user-friendly.

2. Hyundai engineered this engine for the highway. At 80 mph, the 2.5T engine is turning a lazy 2000 rpm. Unfortunately, that doesn't make it get 30 mpg, but it does keep it in its sweet spot for easy cruising but still ready for action. The little truck is a sleeper, spooling up from 60 to over 100 for brisk passing on 2-lane highways. And like many turbo motors, it seems to accelerate stronger at smaller throttle openings. If you just feed it in instead of flooring it, it pulls hard, because smaller throttle openings force the intake air to mover faster as the engine sucks it in.

Out in the wilds of Arizona, flat areas of 2-lane encourage hooligan passing maneuvers, and the truck is a fun co-conspirator. I saw 100+ mph passes on several occasions. Don't scold me - if I'm in the oncoming lane, I want out of it as soon as possible, and speed gets me there. (What's the statute of limitations on speeding anyway?)

3. This isn't news, but the truck rides like a luxury car on the highway. I couldn't really ask for a better, more comfy ride on the open interstate. It's not floaty at all, and it handles like a sporty car while delivering a really smooth ride. On our return trip the bed was loaded to the gills with luggage, odds and ends, and some really heavy containers. Probably a total of 500lb. Didn't affect the ride or handling at all. Or the gas mileage.

I don't like everything about this truck, but there's more good than bad.
I was always taught,, 10 & 2 is the best hand position for driving.
 

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That's obsolete. In a crash, the airbag can break your arms. 4 and 8 is preferred now.
I believe the NHTSA actually says 7-8 & 4-5 if you turn the wheel with a shuffle. Then 8-9 & 3-4 if you hand over hand turn the wheel.

I like the design of the steering wheel and like it's ergonomics of it. But I'm also a 9/3 10/2 guy since I have more control that way. I road race and use the same hand position on track and on the street. I also use one hand in the street at times. Which they say you should never do. So there is that too. haha
 

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3. This isn't news, but the truck rides like a luxury car on the highway. I couldn't really ask for a better, more comfy ride on the open interstate. It's not floaty at all, and it handles like a sporty car while delivering a really smooth ride.
This is great news as its one of the reason I'm looking forward to the SC over my Dakota.

But I'm also a 9/3 10/2 guy since I have more control that way. I road race and use the same hand position on track and on the street.
Right on - pretty rule #1 they teach you road racing: you shouldn't shuffle steer, both hands on the wheel at all times for maximum safety so 10 & 2 or 9 & 3 is the best. Of course most people don't drive with max safety or control in mind... they do what is comfortable. In parking lot situations you can shuffle but on the road, at speed you should never need that much input.
 

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2020 Kia Stinger GT2
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The problem with 10 & 2 is your arms get tired on long drives. 7 & 4 works pretty well, but that's where the spoke placement and steering wheel ridges come into play.
 

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For long drives I rest a single hand at 6. Like @Mike86merc said this is "wrong" but we all do it. I assume this is where the lane keep assist would be helpful as the vehicle would make all those minor corrections that wear you out over time. For me the SC has to be a good long distance cruiser as I typically drive 2 hours (each way) to my fishing spots.
 

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The problem with 10 & 2 is your arms get tired on long drives. 7 & 4 works pretty well, but that's where the spoke placement and steering wheel ridges come into play.
While we're on the subject, how is the comfort factor for the arm rests on long trips? I usually try to relax my arms on the rests and just lightly keep my hands on the wheel. I've been assuming this would work well with the lane keep magic.
 

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2022 Santa Cruz SE NA-FWD
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Never noticed any discomfort(never crossed my mind), and I rest my arms also...
 

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While we're on the subject, how is the comfort factor for the arm rests on long trips? I usually try to relax my arms on the rests and just lightly keep my hands on the wheel. I've been assuming this would work well with the lane keep magic.
Same here. Features like lane keeping, lane following, and adaptive cruise all work very well at reducing driver fatigue.

I find my elbow on the armrests or on the top of the door panel is all very comfortable. Driving aids allow a light grip on the steering wheel and relaxed arms and shoulders. The driving aids and steering wheel are some of my favorite features on the SC. The seats seem very comfortable as well. I just wish they had more bolstering to them. Come on N line SC! haha
 

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2022 Santa Cruz Limitied (black/black)
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With my Challenger I got $1000 off a three day course in a Hellcat at Bondurant Racing. They taught us to avoid 10 and 2 (and BOTH hands on the wheel at all time) and to use 9 and 3 because in an accident an airbag can blow your hands right off the wheel at 10 and 2. One may wonder how much steering you are doing after an airbag goes off, but I once ate an 18-wheeler and I reflexively held onto the wheel so hard I badly sprained two fingers on my left hand. The other very important thing they taught us is that, if at all possible, steer to avoid an accident rather than braking (you can turn a LOT faster than you can stop) and if you have to stop, pulse your brakes because you can't steer with your brakes locked up.

Initially, I didn't like the steering wheel at all because it was very slippery, but it has worn in and it fine now after the first 500 miles.
 

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With my Challenger I got $1000 off a three day course in a Hellcat at Bondurant Racing. They taught us to avoid 10 and 2 (and BOTH hands on the wheel at all time) and to use 9 and 3 because in an accident an airbag can blow your hands right off the wheel at 10 and 2.
Depends on the design of the wheel. On my C7 10/2 and 9/3 are pretty much the same, the grips tend to force you to 9/3 and the Challenger looks similar.
 

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... if at all possible, steer to avoid an accident rather than braking (you can turn a LOT faster than you can stop) and if you have to stop, pulse your brakes because you can't steer with your brakes locked up.
The SC has antilock brakes and stability control. In an emergency, jam brakes on hard AND steer. Do not try to manually pump the brakes because you will never beat the speed of the computer doing that for you, independently controlling each wheel separately as needed. Manual pumping advice is wrong, will cause an increase of stopping distance, and should never be suggested for vehicles with functional ABS.

Of many sites with identical reference information, please refer here for a simple explanation. Myth Busting: Is Pumping Your Brakes The Safest Way To Handle A Skid?
"An ABS takes the place of your manually pumping your brakes 鈥 it senses a depression in your brake pedal and detects skid conditions. The result, is pulsing your brakes hundreds of times per second, which is endlessly faster than any human can do. This pulsing is said, in some studies, to decrease the risk of accident 35 percent."
 
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