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2022 Sage Grey SC Ultimate
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question for those who have owned their Santa Cruz longer than I have. How long did it take your Distance To Empty (DTE) reading to become accurate? And is the bottom half of the gas tank larger, smaller, or does the gauge read accurately across its entire volume?

I ask, because I haven't pushed the distance on a tank of gas to its limits yet, and I'm not sure how well I can rely on it yet. I know the one in our Equinox is pretty close to spot on at any given moment. So far, can't say the same for the SC. I also know that some vehicles (like my old Sierra) are very slow to empty at first, and then shoot towards the E at the end. IE: when it's showing a half tank left, it's actually down about 2/3. The bottom half of the tank goes much faster than the top.

When I left work tonight, it said I had 280km to empty (174 miles). When I got home 100km later (62 miles) it said I had 208km remaining (129 miles). That's off by over 30% based on actual distance driven. By my math, 67 liter tank at 9.1L/100km [25.8mpg ... my reading tonight was 9.0 on this tank so far, or 26.1mpg] should net me just over 730km [453 miles] per tank at current fuel economy. So I should have plenty of gas for another round trip to work, even if the DTE reading says I could be close to running on fumes getting home.

How are your tanks of gas and gauges comparing in the real world?
 

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I noticed this the other day - I was about 150 miles away from home and the dash told me I had 130 miles to empty. I decided to refuel closer to home but by the time I got home I still had 20-25 miles left til empty on the display. At least I’d rather it be off in that way and not the opposite!
 

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Miles to empty is determined by CURRENT fuel use. Observe your instant MPG. It will vary from low teens to over 50 depending on throttle application. Miles to empty is calculated as an estimate based on a recent time window of driving and the average of fuel usage as calculated by fuel through the injectors... Drive like a granny, the number goes up. Play with a little turbo goodness and it goes down.
 

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I also know that some vehicles (like my old Sierra) are very slow to empty at first, and then shoot towards the E at the end. IE: when it's showing a half tank left, it's actually down about 2/3. The bottom half of the tank goes much faster than the top.
I've noticed this with just about every vehicle I've owned. My Dakota is particularly bad about it. The second half of the tank disappears so quickly any calculation you make at the 1/2 way point is way off. My only guess is the fuel level shows "full" until it drops several gallons. Most vehicles report empty when there is still 2 gallons in the tank combine these two things and errors start to add up.

Also DTE is based on recent fuel mileage (last 10 miles or so?) so if your on the highway the DTE might go up, then you arrive in the city and it drops since your real MPG went down. I've seen this tracking my C7 - you leave the track after getting 6 MPG :p and DTE tells me I'll never make it home, then it realizes (slowly) that I am driving like a normal human again (getting 18 MPG+) and thus have plenty of range.
 

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2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz SEL Premium AWD 2.5T Blue Stone
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I haven't paid much attention to it, other than to use it as a signal to fill up the tank.

I'm just happier that it's more accurate than the fuel gauge on my BV350. I'd fill that tank (3.3 gallons), and get 30 miles on the first 1/4 of the tank. The second 1/4 of a tank would yield another 30 miles. The third 1/4 of a tank would get me 40-50 miles further. The final 1/4 would get me 30-50 miles. I got in the habit of resetting the trip odometer at every fill up and would gas up after 140-150 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, I'd say based on this morning, the 2nd half of this tank is definitely smaller than the first. Bluelink reported 47% remaining last night, with about 410km on the tank. This morning, after driving to work (100km), it's now showing 28% remaining. That 3rd quarter tank went away twice as fast as the first two, and my fuel economy number hasn't changed. (Sitting at 9.0l/100km on the tank with a little over 500km on it.)

So it was at 208km remaining last night. After a 100km drive this morning, it's showing 140km to empty. Looks like the gauge runs much like my old truck ... half tank remaining is closer to 1/3 remaining. On an up note, I have no problems going three days between fills right now, same as the Equinox. Only difference is the SC holds about 12 more litres of gas.

Overall, I'm quite happy with my early mileage results. Even more happy with the driver assist features - particularly adaptive cruise control. I mentioned to my wife this morning on the way in how I hadn't realized how much of my road rage was just from having to turn off the cruise control for people who can't decide how fast they want to go. That speed up/slow down crap irritates me. Just pick a speed!! :p With the adaptive on, it's so stress-free!! It just adjusts itself until I hit a passing lane! Yes, I realize that makes me sound like some insane speed demon, but it's really that there are so many ungodly slow people on the roads doing 5 or 10 under the speed limit ... or exactly the speed limit. There should be special roads just for those types. Especially the ones who do that and then pin the gas on passing lanes so you can't get by them - and slam the brakes when the passing lane ends. Ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo the rage that induces!! LOL
 
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Thanks for the info, it sure sounds like my other cars: you can't simply take the 1/2 tank mileage and double it for range :(

It might be due to the shape of the tank...
Luggage and bags Bag Gadget Personal protective equipment Font


The deeper part of the tank is on the driver's side. The red hose (#12) is the fuel filler. The tanks is saddle style that goes over the driveshaft. Its located directly in front of the rear diff. Access to the fuel pump is under the rear seats (good move - easy to service).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That image looks exactly like my observation. Good to know about the fuel pump. Did they actually think ahead about a part that eventually fails and put an access door under the seat?? I had to cut a hole in the bed of my old GMC to change the pump a few years back. Not pretty, but it worked when 20+ years of salt and grime made bed bolt removal an exercise in "You're going to need a plasma torch for that." Reciprocating saw and a metal blade did the job just fine. LOL Ghetto, but effective.
 

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The shape of the tank has less to do with it as most fuel floats have more accurate and closer spaced reading as the fuel gets lower in the tank. This is mostly the reason why vehicles have a "larger" first half of the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Gas tank + plasma torch = lead story on the local news!
That was what it was going to take to get the bolts out to lift the bed ... so I cut a hole and went through the top instead. No sparks off the recip saw. Although if it had gone up, it WAS right outside the newsroom door, in the radio station parking lot, at the time! They never fail at home, in the driveway.
 

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Did they actually think ahead about a part that eventually fails and put an access door under the seat??
It appears so (y)

My old 350Z was like this too. My C7? ...not so much, tons of work involved to get to the tank. Since most Corvettes are garage queens / nice weather only cars they sit for months and the fuel sender gets stuck. Then everyone curses because its an expensive repair to the drop the tank just to reach the cheap sender. Thanks again GM :(

The shape of the tank has less to do with it as most fuel floats have more accurate and closer spaced reading as the fuel gets lower in the tank. This is mostly the reason why vehicles have a "larger" first half of the tank.
Interesting. My boat does the same thing so you might be onto something here. That tank is almost perfectly rectangular and not some odd size like car tanks. Many vehicles have this saddle style tanks (required in RWD or AWD) and some have transfer pumps to move the fluid from the right side or the left side (where ever the pickup is). I have no idea how the float knows how much gas is in there when you have two cambers like this o_O
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, did my first full fill-up after the days of the commute to work. 604.1km on 52.043L works out to 8.6L/100km or 27.35mpg (US). But the trip computer calculated that same track of gas at 9.0L/100km.

Is it weird that measured fuel economy beats out calculated? Most people say it's the other way around usually.

To hit the calculated mileage I'd have had to underfill the tank by 2.3 liters, or 2/5 of a gallon. So I'm inclined to believe the actual numbers from the odometer/pump.

Either way, I'm getting 3 days of commute from a tank, like we do from the Equinox, and it was still showing 64km on the DTE, which lends me to believe there's really another 100km in there, since the low fuel warning hadn't chimed yet either. Normally those go around 80km remaining.

Pretty happy with just over 27mpg so far though!
 

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To hit the calculated mileage I'd have had to underfill the tank by 2.3 liters, or 2/5 of a gallon. So I'm inclined to believe the actual numbers from the odometer/pump.
Given the density of fuel (based on temperature) and that every pump tends to auto stop differently I'd say this is well within calculated tolerances. I can normally squeeze between 1 to 2 gallons extra in after the pump shuts off the first time, so a 1/2 gallon here or there is nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
TECHNICALLY, the fuel density thing shouldn't be a factor. After all, every single pump says (I believe it's by law here) that the volume is adjusted to 15 degrees C up here. So, unless they're lying, that shouldn't be part of the equation. Not sure what the rules on it are in the US.

I did somewhat confirm my long-standing suspicions about one gas station in town. I always found I had lower mpg when I filled up there. Filled up at my regular station last night, had a 0.3L/100km increase in mileage this morning. On it's own, that means little. But considering I normally saw 0.3-0.5L/100km difference in our Equinox between the same two gas stations ... the data becomes more relevant. Guessing one runs the max allowed ethanol blend, the other uses less.
 

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Given the density of fuel (based on temperature) and that every pump tends to auto stop differently I'd say this is well within calculated tolerances. I can normally squeeze between 1 to 2 gallons extra in after the pump shuts off the first time, so a 1/2 gallon here or there is nothing.
As a former multi-decade practitioner of 'topping off,' I offer the following unsolicited advice (purloined from RepairPal.com):

3 reasons why topping off is bad
1. It can hurt your car: When you fill up your gas tank to the tippy-top, you may not be leaving enough room for the vapor recovery system in your car to do its job. If the fuel level inside the tank is too high, causing the charcoal canister to suck in liquid fuel instead of vapors, it can be damaged and need replacement — and that can be expensive.

2. It can hurt the environment: If you overfill your tank, you can spill gasoline on the ground. Spilled gas will instantly evaporate, go into the atmosphere, and create smog when the sunlight hits it. Gasoline is also toxic, and you definitely don’t want to breathe the fumes, or get it on your skin or clothes. Plus, it’s a fire hazard.

3. It can
hurt your wallet: The vapor recovery systems at gas stations are designed to recapture not only gasoline vapors, but also any excess gasoline being pumped into a car’s tank. This means that the extra gasoline may actually be going right back into the gas station’s storage tanks — but you’re still getting charged for it.
 

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As a former multi-decade practitioner of 'topping off,' I offer the following unsolicited advice (purloined from RepairPal.com):

3 reasons why topping off is bad
1. It can hurt your car: When you fill up your gas tank to the tippy-top, you may not be leaving enough room for the vapor recovery system in your car to do its job. If the fuel level inside the tank is too high, causing the charcoal canister to suck in liquid fuel instead of vapors, it can be damaged and need replacement — and that can be expensive.

2. It can hurt the environment: If you overfill your tank, you can spill gasoline on the ground. Spilled gas will instantly evaporate, go into the atmosphere, and create smog when the sunlight hits it. Gasoline is also toxic, and you definitely don’t want to breathe the fumes, or get it on your skin or clothes. Plus, it’s a fire hazard.

3. It can
hurt your wallet: The vapor recovery systems at gas stations are designed to recapture not only gasoline vapors, but also any excess gasoline being pumped into a car’s tank. This means that the extra gasoline may actually be going right back into the gas station’s storage tanks — but you’re still getting charged for it.
Wow....... now you can consider me a "former practitioner" as well!! Thanks for the info.
 

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As a former multi-decade practitioner of 'topping off,' I offer the following unsolicited advice (purloined from RepairPal.com):
Its a risk but pumps vary so much (why is this?). There are some stations I avoid just because they shut off way too easily (like a hair trigger) and others that shut off at that last possible second spilling out some fuel. Depends on the vehicle too. Maybe I should move to NJ or OR and let someone deal with it ;)
 

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I just finished burning off the dealers full tank just to get rid of the 89 octane so I never bothered to calculate.....I have always used 94 or 91 octane so now with a new full tank I will see what I average with a 50/50 split of highway/city driving. I also suspect I will have a little more jump when I punch it...:oops:
 

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I just finished burning off the dealers full tank just to get rid of the 89 octane so I never bothered to calculate.....I have always used 94 or 91 octane so now with a new full tank I will see what I average with a 50/50 split of highway/city driving. I also suspect I will have a little more jump when I punch it...:oops:
Very much a common misconception that higher octane equals higher power. Octane rating is a measure of how much engine compression the fuel will endure before igniting on its own (causing knock), without the spark plug having triggered it. Unless you have a high compression engine, that is noticeably pre-igniting (knocking) badly due to low octane fuel, changing over to a higher octane fuel does absolutely nothing except waste money.

Modern engines, with all their sensors and adjustably, are able to adapt to fuel octane levels, to a point. When running the lowest octane fuel, that the manufactured allows for, you are within the parameters. The only time you might slip outside that adjustably window is if you are pulling a heavy load on an uphill grade. In that scenario, where you are really demanding engine output, creating a lot of heat, you might experience (feel/hear) some engine knock. In that case, upping the octane makes sense until you return to a normal, no-load, situation.
 
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