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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody know a source for the sliding anchor points in the inside bed rails? I would like to have a couple more so that I could have one more forward and one to the rear on each side.

These gizmos right here.
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I have not seen one. I think I saw where Toyota had some similar sliding anchor points…but I don’t think the dimensions were compatible. Well, one things for sure….you won’t know till you ask. If I think about it next week, I’ll call the local dealer and get the info.
 

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Ok, I went to the stealership today and asked the parts dept about the sliding cleats. They told me the cleats did not come separately….but can be ordered with the whole rail assembly…..for….are you ready? $818.95 per side! 🤣😂🤣😝. Part # 857T0-K5000. I hope this is right part number….but the parts guy would not let me see the screen to make sure we were talking about the same thing. Anyway, I said thanks….but NO. That’s ridiculous. Some aftermarket company needs to make something similar. I like these, because they have a positive stop that keeps them in place and are easy to move. Maybe I’ll see if I can buy some off of a wrecked SC…at a wrecking yard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
But is it really just traditional C TRack and is it a traditional off the shelf size?

Here attached is one of the cleats . The end cap on the track is held n place by a single T30 screw.
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I am thinking about trying one of these just for grins and seeing if i can maybe put a right sized washer on the T bolt mill.shape my own T-but to fit the track. It wont be as quick and the factory cleats with the positive stops and probably more prone to slide but would be a starting point.

 

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I can tell you what does NOT work:
While they would physically slide in the tracks, the T-Bolt did not have enough "meat" on it to inspire any confidence. In other words, it was too narrow for the track. I was able to align the "T" portion at about a 45 degree angle to get it to tighten up, but was so not ok with the lack of contact within the slot. I felt like any load on it would bend the track lip, and it would pull right out.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I can tell you what does NOT work:
While they would physically slide in the tracks, the T-Bolt did not have enough "meat" on it to inspire any confidence.
I have looked at those and other similar ones on Amazon and echo what you say about enough meat. But $16 for 2 of them probably means I will be buying 2 to play with.

I am worried that anything that tightens and actually clamps to the aluminum channel itself might if jolted mar and deform the channel/tracks and then the oem cleats might have trouble sliding and operating smoothly.

Right now I have 3D printed this little block that is a analog for the base of the OEM cleat. This is a rough first print our of PLA with low infill but it actually fits inside the track quite well. I am sorta thinking maybe take these Tacoma/Tundra/Ram/Gladiator cleats off amazon as you show and adapt them with a pin that will tighten into the existing positive stop points rather than something that clamps onto the track itself.

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I am liking the direction you are headed here; keep us "in the loop"! (y) :D
 

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I have not seen one. I think I saw where Toyota had some similar sliding anchor points…but I don’t think the dimensions were compatible. Well, one things for sure….you won’t know till you ask. If I think about it next week, I’ll call the local dealer and get the info.
I had a Tundra and saved mine thinking I could use them on the Santa Cruz, but no go wouldn't fit.
 

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I have looked at those and other similar ones on Amazon and echo what you say about enough meat. But $16 for 2 of them probably means I will be buying 2 to play with.

I am worried that anything that tightens and actually clamps to the aluminum channel itself might if jolted mar and deform the channel/tracks and then the oem cleats might have trouble sliding and operating smoothly.

Right now I have 3D printed this little block that is a analog for the base of the OEM cleat. This is a rough first print our of PLA with low infill but it actually fits inside the track quite well. I am sorta thinking maybe take these Tacoma/Tundra/Ram/Gladiator cleats off amazon as you show and adapt them with a pin that will tighten into the existing positive stop points rather than something that clamps onto the track itself.

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Once you're dialed, it would be awesome if you would share the STL file.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok the ordered anchors Tacoma Bed cleats from Amazon arrived and I tool a different approach. They seem solidly made and in the end I am happy with what I got.

From the link above here is what you get.
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What is not visible there is that the T bold has a flat on one side of the threads so that it does not spin in the assembly and that is good. Also you see on the underside of the cleat the protrusions that ride in the channel and keep it aligned. At first glance it looks like all you need is a washer on the back side to give the T head a little more meat and you are good to go. So that was the approach I took. I had washers on hand and 1.25" washers fit in the channel perfectly.


But, hold on a second. That didn't work. See the round protrusion in the center? That sticks out farther than the thickness of the channel material so you cannot tighten down and clamp to the channel/rail. Simple enough - 2 minutes with a saw and a file to cut that off flush.
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Now the clear rides in the rail and can tighten down. But wait. The knob a multi-piece assembly that has a built in slip-cam to keep it from being over-tightened. The result is thatI could not tighten it down enough for it not to easily slip in the rail.
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I thought about putting some high strength epoxy in each of those locations to keep it from slipping and that would probably work just fine. But instead I just got a Star Knob to ffit the bolt and used that. The blt is M8x1.25

Here is what I ended up with up with. I have a stack of 6 fender washers just to mostly fil lthe channel depth and what I had on hand was thin washers. Totally not necessary. One, particularly one thick washer one be fine. Use 1.25" washer they fit well in the channel with 5/16 holes to fit over the M8 bolt.
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Here it is installed side by side with the OEM. FInal cost is probably around $10 per cleat.
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