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Very cool - As long as it does the basics on the truck stuff I am cool, which is why the Santa Cruz is perfect for me.

Thanks for supplying proof that this truck can work as well as play! To me it seems like a perfect balance.
 

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I like seeing this. A buddy works for Cars.com and just spent a few days with the Santa Cruz. He said it handles unbelievably well for a truck(?) / SUV. With the handling, improvements didn't come a harsh ride and somehow NVH is even better than other Hyundai vehicles. That is pretty amazing as many times manufacturers just use heavier spring rates or valved shocks to get a stiffer ride that most people probably associate with handling. It will be interesting to see what happens with the N-Line version of the Santa Cruz. One better happen! And hopefully, it is a better performer with no major trade-offs.

But my buddy did say that it didn't take much to get the tires to start making noise with lateral movement. He suspects that a better performance tire may make the handling even better. So I am looking forward to seeing your observations are with these.

Also, what other tires did you consider buying?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very cool - As long as it does the basics on the truck stuff I am cool, which is why the Santa Cruz is perfect for me.

Thanks for supplying proof that this truck can work as well as play! To me it seems like a perfect balance.
Also the load floor is kinda high, I had to squat and lift the tires in order not to hurt my back
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I like seeing this. A buddy works for Cars.com and just spent a few days with the Santa Cruz. He said it handles unbelievably well for a truck(?) / SUV. With the handling, improvements didn't come a harsh ride and somehow NVH is even better than other Hyundai vehicles. That is pretty amazing as many times manufacturers just use heavier spring rates or valved shocks to get a stiffer ride that most people probably associate with handling. It will be interesting to see what happens with the N-Line version of the Santa Cruz. One better happen! And hopefully, it is a better performer with no major trade-offs.

But my buddy did say that it didn't take much to get the tires to start making noise with lateral movement. He suspects that a better performance tire may make the handling even better. So I am looking forward to seeing your observations are with these.

Also, what other tires did you consider buying?
I have been VERY gentle with the SC currently under 1500 miles so can't really say much if the OE Michelin Primacy tires are put to their limit, but just from the nature of touring all season tires, they should not have as much grip as these Toyo directional tires I'm putting on.

I've looked into Michelin Pilot Sport SUV, but they only offer the size of 20", and I'm going to downsize to 18" for lighter wheels, so the Toyo Proxes STIII are 1 of the most performance oriented 245/60/R18 tires out there and cheap. The reviews say they handle horribly in snow, but trucks/SUVs feel like they are on rails with these tires on dry pavement so I'm going to find out.
 

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That is pretty amazing as many times manufacturers just use heavier spring rates or valved shocks to get a stiffer ride that most people probably associate with handling.
I think its the self-leveling rear suspension that allows it to be softer than it otherwise would need to be to not sag under load. That's something the Maverick doesn't have, so will be interesting to see how Ford tackled that problem. I suppose the other solution is to just go with progressive springs, so that under moderate compression they stay softer, but if you really load the bed up the maximum sag is minimized. You'd still get sag, but not extreme. Don't know why they don't put self leveling with those fancy shocks or just old school airbags for all pickups.
I've looked into Michelin Pilot Sport SUV, but they only offer the size of 20", and I'm going to downsize to 18" for lighter wheels
Makes me wonder what the weight of the factory 18"s are in comparison to the 20"s.
 

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I have been VERY gentle with the SC currently under 1500 miles so can't really say much if the OE Michelin Primacy tires are put to their limit, but just from the nature of touring all season tires, they should not have as much grip as these Toyo directional tires I'm putting on.

I've looked into Michelin Pilot Sport SUV, but they only offer the size of 20", and I'm going to downsize to 18" for lighter wheels, so the Toyo Proxes STIII are 1 of the most performance oriented 245/60/R18 tires out there and cheap. The reviews say they handle horribly in snow, but trucks/SUVs feel like they are on rails with these tires on dry pavement so I'm going to find out.
The production tire is usually picked based on price and a compromise of many different requirements. Whereas a more costly but specific summer only, performance tire can improve handling and braking a lot. It will just be interesting what a tire and different alignment could do for the Santa Cruz. Eliminate some of the understeer and mid-corner issues.

I am in the Chicagoland area. I have a feeling I will have a lighter, better-performing wheel/tire combo for summer. Then the OE wheels/tires for winter use. Like I do with most of my cars. I am one that doesn't shy away from modding my vehicles. haha


I think its the self-leveling rear suspension that allows it to be softer than it otherwise would need to be to not sag under load. That's something the Maverick doesn't have, so will be interesting to see how Ford tackled that problem. I suppose the other solution is to just go with progressive springs, so that under moderate compression they stay softer, but if you really load the bed up the maximum sag is minimized. You'd still get sag, but not extreme. Don't know why they don't put self leveling with those fancy shocks or just old school airbags for all pickups.

Makes me wonder what the weight of the factory 18"s are in comparison to the 20"s.
I have not seen what they use for the self-leveling rear suspension on the Santa Cruz. I know I read it isn't an air ride system of any sort. I'm interested to see what it is. As well as if it will make changing the ride height difficult or not. I am interested to see what these looked lowered as well as lifted. Of course, I would like to see systems that don't kill the ride it seems Hyundai engineers really worked out. Or killing the usefulness of the bed or hauling capabilities.

Hopefully, these sell well enough that the aftermarket puts effort into things besides accessories. Like suspensions, engine performance, etc. It will be interesting to see if any Santa Cruz would be at SEMA with mods. Not sure Hyundai gets into those kinds of builds like other manufactures do.

I think this is a neat vehicle and the right time for one. The Santa Cruz has a lot going for it and allowing owners more customization options would be awesome.
 

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Looking at the picture from above the truck, it looks like the handle of the tonneau cover further restricts space in the bed, nearly as much as the cannister itself. Is that correct or did it just not retract far enough? Thank you for sharing the pics, @soldthetaco.
 

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I have not seen what they use for the self-leveling rear suspension on the Santa Cruz. I know I read it isn't an air ride system of any sort. I'm interested to see what it is. As well as if it will make changing the ride height difficult or not.
The shocks handle the ride-leveling, you'd just have to remove them instead of just doing lowering springs, which is a shame as its a cool feature IMO. It is an air suspension, just doesn't use typical air bag bladders like you might traditionally see, its all built into the shock. When you put a bunch of weight on the back, the suspension will squat, but as you drive down the road the up and down motion of the shock causes it to pump itself up, and it does so until its level again. When you take the weight off, the butt will go up in the air and slowly release the pressure without having to drive anywhere until its level again by just using gravity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I think its the self-leveling rear suspension that allows it to be softer than it otherwise would need to be to not sag under load. That's something the Maverick doesn't have, so will be interesting to see how Ford tackled that problem. I suppose the other solution is to just go with progressive springs, so that under moderate compression they stay softer, but if you really load the bed up the maximum sag is minimized. You'd still get sag, but not extreme. Don't know why they don't put self leveling with those fancy shocks or just old school airbags for all pickups.

Makes me wonder what the weight of the factory 18"s are in comparison to the 20"s.
I just took off 1 of the OE 20" with tire on, the whole wheel weighs 64 pounds, I looked up the tire weight value is 31 pounds, that means the 20" wheel itself is 33 pounds. That is insane

my 18" replacement wheel only weights 16.4 pounds, and those Toyo 60 series tires only increase weight by 1 pound, so after the swap my total wheel weight = 48.4 pounds

@JMII it's pretty much safe to say downsizing wheel diameter while holding tire diameter constant pretty much guaranteeing weight saving. Metal weighs >>>> than rubber

and while I save 62.4 pounds in all 4 corners, I'll be adding another 50 pounds of tow hitch so net weight loss is not that much
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The shocks handle the ride-leveling, you'd just have to remove them instead of just doing lowering springs, which is a shame as its a cool feature IMO. It is an air suspension, just doesn't use typical air bag bladders like you might traditionally see, its all built into the shock. When you put a bunch of weight on the back, the suspension will squat, but as you drive down the road the up and down motion of the shock causes it to pump itself up, and it does so until its level again. When you take the weight off, the butt will go up in the air and slowly release the pressure without having to drive anywhere until its level again by just using gravity.
1969



1971


1972


must be hidden in the shock absorber the auto height adjusting feature
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Looking at the picture from above the truck, it looks like the handle of the tonneau cover further restricts space in the bed, nearly as much as the cannister itself. Is that correct or did it just not retract far enough? Thank you for sharing the pics, @soldthetaco.
the tonneau cover was retracted fully, and yes having it will reduce 3 sides accessibility
 

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Does it say "Sachs" on the shock anywhere? Seems to be the most popular brand of self-leveling shocks. Yours look kind of similar to the self-leveling shocks on a Durango:
Everything I've read said that self-leveling shocks are on all SCs, even the SE model.
 

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and while I save 62.4 pounds in all 4 corners, I'll be adding another 50 pounds of tow hitch so net weight loss is not that much
Reducing rotating weight will make more of a difference than adding static weight will.
 

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Reducing rotating weight will make more of a difference than adding static weight will.
It isn't much, but you're removing that weight change from unsprung and adding it to sprung.
 
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I just took off 1 of the OE 20" with tire on, the whole wheel weighs 64 pounds, I looked up the tire weight value is 31 pounds, that means the 20" wheel itself is 33 pounds. That is insane

my 18" replacement wheel only weights 16.4 pounds, and those Toyo 60 series tires only increase weight by 1 pound, so after the swap my total wheel weight = 48.4 pounds

@JMII it's pretty much safe to say downsizing wheel diameter while holding tire diameter constant pretty much guaranteeing weight saving. Metal weighs >>>> than rubber

and while I save 62.4 pounds in all 4 corners, I'll be adding another 50 pounds of tow hitch so net weight loss is not that much
Very interested to hear how the SC handles with all the wheel weight savings! I’ve got a similar aftermarket wheel/tire weight currently with 17s on my Subie, hoping I can just transfer them to the SC without issue.
 
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