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My father was a DJ in the late seventies and as such, he was always big on acoustics and sound quality. Bose 901 reference speakers were THE speaker to have back then. While I have owned many Bose products over the years, I feel, like many of you do, that the Bose name is just that. A name. And even though I paid for that name in my Limited, I found another name I like better. JL Audio. I thought I would post some pictures of my build and share some insight so you can build your own.
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The large black plastic frame IS the window regulator. A little trial and error and it comes apart fairly easily. I only removed mine on all four doors because I wanted to add Dynamat to the doors. I know there are other products but I had this left over from another project.
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The rubber plug is removed to expose the bolt that mounts the window glass to the regulator. Make sure to use suction cups or tape to hold the glass up.
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You can see that Hyundai did not apply and sound deadening material whatsoever. Any sort of acoustic material will add to your sound quality. Not to mention that now the doors don't sound like a tuna can when closing!
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Only a couple of pieces are needed for deadening.
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This is a photo of the backside (inside) of the passenger front door panel. The rest are similar. Release this clip with a small flat screwdriver and the entire regulator will slide towards the interior of the truck and release.
 

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This is the right rear Bose door speaker. Look closely at the next picture. It's a five inch speaker in a 6 1/2 frame.
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This picture shows the inner door panel clip that you remove with your little screwdriver. Sorry it's out of place.
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All four doors received the same set of JL Audio C2 components. You can see the crossover placement in this picture that shows the driver's side rear door.
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This is the right rear completed. The tweeter was installed after drilling a hole in the door panel. I do not recall the measurements but space is limited.

I held all four tweeters in place using hot glue. I did not take any photos of that process.

I then added the 10" Kicker hideaway module as many others have, to replace the factory subwoofer enclosure. I was able to determine that two would fit so that's what I went with. Two tens are better than one!
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More photos showing the electronics part of the install.
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Everything fits neatly under the driver's seat. While I know many of you will have reservations cutting the factory wiring, I knew this was the only way I was going to achieve the results I wanted.

Following the speaker wiring colors in the above chart, I cut them one at a time where the signal comes out of the Bose amplifier and is headed to the speakers. I fed that signal into an Audio Control LC7i converter. All four door speakers are fed to the converter and thus converted to RCA output. Those RCA's go to a Soundstream RSM4.1200D
The LC7i will split the sub frequency and those go to the subwoofers behind the seat. Not pictured is the remote bass level knob that you can buy separate to control the LC7i. Part# ACR-1 The Kickers will come with knobs but they will not control two at a time. They will have to be run independently without this LC7i or similar component.

The end result is phenomenal. Crisp and loud and plenty of bass! I listen to a lot of trance, dubstep etc. and I am satisfied with this setup.

I hope I have inspired some of you to go build the stereo of your dreams!
 

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2022 Santa Cruz SE NA-FWD In Idaho
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I'm not into heavy thumping and all that but the Stock system (SE base model) is anemic.... I have go full throttle on some songs just to hear it... I would like at least a small amp installed but I would love to insulate the doors, that is one of my complaints, is how the SC sounds when you shut the doors... Tuna Can...YEP
 

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Awesome writeup for sure. I did something similar but have my 10's (Rockville) under the driver and passenger seats. I'm running JBLs on my door panels and wish I would have ran those to an amp. The factory head unit just doesn't have enough juice to push the speakers to its max potential. I was too lazy to apply sound deadening =)
 

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Nice work and thanks for the pictures (y):cool:

Interesting how they did the doors as an empty shell with everything mounted to a removable plastic panel, that sure makes it easier to fix a broken window regulator and access the outer door skin to sound proof. Normally all you have is random, oddly shaped access holes as an inner metal door skin. In fact many times the speakers are mounted directly to that metal. So I bet that plastic composite inner piece works pretty good as sound deadening material itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The plastic shell is the window regulator. Easy to change out in the event of failure. I almost called the stealership to find out what it costs but I think I'd lose my lunch.
 

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Nice work and thanks for the pictures (y):cool:

Interesting how they did the doors as an empty shell with everything mounted to a removable plastic panel, that sure makes it easier to fix a broken window regulator and access the outer door skin to sound proof. Normally all you have is random, oddly shaped access holes as an inner metal door skin. In fact many times the speakers are mounted directly to that metal. So I bet that plastic composite inner piece works pretty good as sound deadening material itself.
The plastic window regulator may provide some baffling, but it is not going to dampen the vibration of the sheet metal panel. I bet you don't have any sheet metal panels in your home speakers or in your Marshall stacks on stage. This is going to be exponentially more important as you turn up the volume.
This is such an awesome presentation of a sound upgrade. That OEM Bose speaker looks like it cost about $0.29.
 

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it’ll be in the thousands! They did the recall on the cover latch for my truck. Just that handle was supposedly 2,200 dollars. 😂🤣
$2200 for a latch? That must be prat + labor inflated cost back to Hyundai to increase the profit to the dealer LOL. My dealer's shop labor rate is $195/ hr. The most expensive dealer rate in the area. A simple calculation of $2,200/195 = 11 hours for the job . I wonder if the mechanic makes over $25 per hour?
 

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You are correct the hourly rate includes direct labor cost, overhead
the point is...your hourly rate is not just the grease money
costs such as taxes, building repair , insurances and secretarty time, sales and other time not billable etc plus profit. My expereince normal mark up of costs included in all of the other ovehead items and proifit is 3 to 3.5 therefore if a mechanic is paid $25/hr, the billing rate is 3.5 x $ 25 = $87.50 . Lets round that to $95-$100 / hr. leaving a profit margin of $195/$100 = 95% taxible profit. I only know of doctors and lawyers who make that level of profit. Boeing's profit is less than 5%. Ford, GM and Chysler is about 3-5%. Hyundai average quarterly profit has been about 17%. Their holdback amount is reported to be 2% of the new cars MSRP. So you do the math. Maybe mechanics make $50/ hr of $100,000/year
 
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