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I found these strange numbers on the Motor Trend site too:

"Curiously, the base-engine (2.5-liter) Santa Cruz with all-wheel-drive generates the best fuel economy in the lineup with an EPA-estimated 21 mpg city, 27 mpg highway, and 23 mpg combined. Choosing the front-wheel-drive model delivers the same 21 mpg city and 23 mpg combined, but for some reason drops the highway number by 1 mpg to 26 mpg. (Typically, two-wheel-drive versions of new vehicles are more fuel efficient than their all-wheel-drive counterparts, thanks to lower weight and less driveline drag.) Normalcy returns to the fuel economy estimates when it comes to the optional turbocharged engine, which (with all-wheel drive) drops the Santa Cruz's mpg ratings to 19 mpg city and 22 mpg combined, while somehow maintaining the base-engine's 27-mpg highway best."

2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz: Small Truck, Not Exactly Big Fuel Economy (motortrend.com)
 

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Maybe Dr. Faucci has been reassigned to EPA.
 

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Plain and simple...if I want a 4dr truck with a combined 22mpg, I can get a Ranger...

We'll have to see how the Maverick stacks-up.

In all honesty, if the Maverick gets similar gas mileage to the Santa Cruz, I'll probably be rocking a Tuscon Hybrid this time next year.
 

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Plain and simple...if I want a 4dr truck with a combined 22mpg, I can get a Ranger...
I think that is main disappointment here, I (like many) assumed the SC would do a little better. The Ranger has very similar power figures but must weight more, plus its a traditional brick shaped pickup. So the 10 speed auto must be helping the Ranger in the city. However on the highway the SC's aero gains the advantage back (and then some). In the end its a wash with a combined 22. I bet short shifting the DCT will allow you creep back 1 MPG here or there. I'm wondering what real world reports will look like. Per Fuelly.com the Ranger tends to under perform only getting 20 as an average.
 

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I think that is main disappointment here, I (like many) assumed the SC would do a little better. . Per Fuelly.com the Ranger tends to under perform only getting 20 as an average.

That's part of my dissolution with the EPA numbers for the Santa Cruz...after the first 25k miles, most vehicles underperform their sticker MPG numbers. My Honda Insight was supposed to be 40/44, but most of the time, at 100k miles, I'm lucky to get high 30's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I think that is main disappointment here, I (like many) assumed the SC would do a little better. The Ranger has very similar power figures but must weight more, plus its a traditional brick shaped pickup. So the 10 speed auto must be helping the Ranger in the city. However on the highway the SC's aero gains the advantage back (and then some). In the end its a wash with a combined 22. I bet short shifting the DCT will allow you creep back 1 MPG here or there. I'm wondering what real world reports will look like. Per Fuelly.com the Ranger tends to under perform only getting 20 as an average.
I'm usually driving highway, and speaking of the 2.5T, I checked on a Sonata forum as well as Car and Driver, and it seems the advertised highway fuel economy is pretty spot on at 33mpg. I also like that the 2.5T is both direct and port injection, best of both worlds, so in theory no fouling issues down the road. They are also putting this 2.5T in the Stinger now, which may be an option too as the Stinger has a liftback design. A hitch on a Stinger would be fine for bicycle rack and one of those small uhaul trailers for gardening trips and what not, and looks pretty stealth:

So the fuel economy of the 2.5T AWD is not a deal-breaker for me, but I'm going to stay tuned for official MSRP for the SEL Premium or Limited with the 2.5T AWD. Hopefully the limited stays under $40K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The EPA test is not "normal" driving, its done in a lab under very controlled conditions: Detailed Test Information The highway test for example uses a max speed of 60 MPH and an average speed of 48 with the A/C off - who drives like that?
It says on that link they adjust for AC and higher speeds though: "Beginning with 2008 models, three additional tests are used to adjust the city and highway estimates to account for higher speeds, air conditioning use, and colder temperatures " And says in 2017 it was adjusted again.

 

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That's part of my dissolution with the EPA numbers for the Santa Cruz...after the first 25k miles, most vehicles underperform their sticker MPG numbers. My Honda Insight was supposed to be 40/44, but most of the time, at 100k miles, I'm lucky to get high 30's.
I would imagine this has a lot to do with the battery being less productive at 100k than new, not so much to do with the engine.
 
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