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Discussion Starter #1
I'm just gonna lay this out there:

The dangling option of a diesel engine in the Santa Cruz is going to make or break it's success and longevity in the United States. Here's why I think so:

In the United States, when it comes to trucks - and all vehicles for the most part, lately - more is more. The new "mid-size" class of trucks would be more aptly called "less gargantuan" or "junior colossus". The size of these trucks alone is what turned me away from them, and I believe I'm not the only one. What happened to the old rangers, the old colorados, the dakotas? They've all but disappeared or grown larger, leaving nothing in the true small pickup class.

Point being, as stated at the release of the Santa Cruz, people like myself aren't interested in the size or cost of a mid to full sized pickup. Everyone likes the idea of the utility of these, however, and that's where the diesel comes in.

With diesel, you get power, you get low-end torque, and you get great MPG to boot. What a perfect storm to finally come to the US market. If the Santa Cruz were to come with this option, I think it would emerge as a surprise work vehicle. This vehicle could legitimately capture a segment of mid-size truck buyers if it's towing or payload could come close, and with the proposed diesel power plant I don't see why that would be impossible.

Honestly, without the diesel, I think it will fall short despite being a great idea due to being underpowered. I hope that Hyundai will learn from the mistakes of the Subaru Baja (may it rest in peace). They know that people don't want the price, size or cost of maintenance with a truck, hence this vehicle; however, I hope they realize the utility of this vehicle has to go beyond an open bed.

In short, if the Santa Cruz is equipped with the proposed TD engine, not only will this vehicle beat out mid-size trucks in size, cost and MPG, but it will also be on par for power, making it a true competitor and not just a novelty.

I can say that living in a small town where it snows a lot, there is a market of people STARVED for a vehicle just like this one. Up here in Wisconsin, if they made these Diesel Santa Cruz's, you wouldn't be able to put them on car lots fast enough.

Can I get an amen?
 

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Didn't the concept model carry a turbocharged 2.0-liter diesel four-cylinder engine? I assumed that they would go towards that direction in terms of engine and fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Didn't the concept model carry a turbocharged 2.0-liter diesel four-cylinder engine? I assumed that they would go towards that direction in terms of engine and fuel.
I'd like to assume so too, but I've read a lot of people on here doubting they'll bring one in and it has me worried. I know that American auto makers don't like putting in diesels for whatever reason. Hopefully Hyundai can break this trend!
 

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Automakers don't like doing diesels in the US for the reason we've seen with the VW scandal. It is very difficult to build a diesel engine to meet the strict EPA and CARB emissions guidelines. Its a huge engineering and cost undertaking, and with the lower take rate and higher costs of diesel ownership, its difficult to make the business case.

Even though the SC is a Hyundai US effort, I think they put the diesel in the concept to give it more of a global appeal and to be able to claim "high 30s mpg". The latter being very important in a country where if you try to sell anything smaller than a fullsize truck but with a small mpg improvement its deemed as a pointless vehicle.

GM is making a push with smaller diesels. The Cruze has one and the Colorado/Canyon Duramax will be hitting lots by the end of the year. They also have diesels in development for Cadillac for their planned re-entry into the European market around the year 2020 and I'm sure those engines will trickle down into their other brands to spread the costs.
http://blog.caranddriver.com/gms-mark-reuss-chevrolet-cruze-diesel-and-cadillac-diesels-are-on-track/

As the global automotive markets continue to align we should see more powertrains designed to meet requirements in all markets so that we will see more diesels here. Though it remains to be seen how the now global backlash from the VW scandal could affect things.
 

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But diesel trucks in the US have proven to be quite successful for the few that have brought them out in recent history. I think diesel makes a lot of sense for this vehicle in particular, assuming it meets regulations. MPG would be in the high 30s, and torque would be great at 300 lb-ft. 190 horsepower is completely adequate.
 

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True, the RAM 1500 Eco Diesels seem to have been well received from what i've seen, they have a noticeable presence on the road which speaks for sales.

Fortunately that's one way for a brand like Hyundai to see if there really is a market for that type of truck.
 

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In other news Mercedes is coming out with a truck, a joint project with Nissan and chances are it could be not that far away from where the current 1500 is. So those with some more to spend... might like that.

 

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Turbo diesel makes no economic sense in a world of $30/bbl oil; you would still be paying off the price difference after the Cruz has been hauled to the compactor 20 years from now.

Direct injection gasoline/turbo has almost the same fuel economy and much less weight/emissions.

If Hyundai is only offering one power train its probably the 1.6l turbo with 7 spd DCT and AWD. Fits the image and has the commonality with the Tuscon to be inexpensive. Dodge can game with the RAM as is they had the image from the Cummins and if it didn't sell, they could bury the loss in 100k gas trucks they knew they would be selling. When you don't know how well something is going to sell; you don't game on a completely different power train.
 

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I'm just gonna lay this out there:

The dangling option of a diesel engine in the Santa Cruz is going to make or break it's success and longevity in the United States. Here's why I think so:

In the United States, when it comes to trucks - and all vehicles for the most part, lately - more is more. The new "mid-size" class of trucks would be more aptly called "less gargantuan" or "junior colossus". The size of these trucks alone is what turned me away from them, and I believe I'm not the only one. What happened to the old rangers, the old colorados, the dakotas? They've all but disappeared or grown larger, leaving nothing in the true small pickup class.

Point being, as stated at the release of the Santa Cruz, people like myself aren't interested in the size or cost of a mid to full sized pickup. Everyone likes the idea of the utility of these, however, and that's where the diesel comes in.

With diesel, you get power, you get low-end torque, and you get great MPG to boot. What a perfect storm to finally come to the US market. If the Santa Cruz were to come with this option, I think it would emerge as a surprise work vehicle. This vehicle could legitimately capture a segment of mid-size truck buyers if it's towing or payload could come close, and with the proposed diesel power plant I don't see why that would be impossible.

Honestly, without the diesel, I think it will fall short despite being a great idea due to being underpowered. I hope that Hyundai will learn from the mistakes of the Subaru Baja (may it rest in peace). They know that people don't want the price, size or cost of maintenance with a truck, hence this vehicle; however, I hope they realize the utility of this vehicle has to go beyond an open bed.

In short, if the Santa Cruz is equipped with the proposed TD engine, not only will this vehicle beat out mid-size trucks in size, cost and MPG, but it will also be on par for power, making it a true competitor and not just a novelty.

I can say that living in a small town where it snows a lot, there is a market of people STARVED for a vehicle just like this one. Up here in Wisconsin, if they made these Diesel Santa Cruz's, you wouldn't be able to put them on car lots fast enough.

Can I get an amen?
Amen.
 

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What are the odds we can see them come to market with a hybrid truck or something greener along those lines? They already seem innovative enough to do this, jumping in early ahead of the curve.
 

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The trouble with the diesel combustion cycle now is this ,these things have such a complex and efficient combustion cycle ,they emit copious amounts of things called nanoparticles,which have been linked to increased incidents of heart attacks ,one reason they are being phased out in some european cities now .
 

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That's what I noticed even since last year, that's when it really became a problem for them, I guess its a good thing there hasn't been much interest in diesel passenger vehicles here, just diesel where it really matters and that's on a commercial level. Now we have hybrids and EV's picking up some big pace, enough to have someone not even give diesel a second look.
 
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