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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After Mike TX mentioned last October he was stranded by the side of the road because a nut in the battery connections was loose, I put an extra set of 1/4 inch drive sockets and a driver into the storage area under the rear seat. Recently, I realized I need to add some tools for after I arrive, not just for possible needs on the way. So, I added a tape measure, an electrical meter, a small lockback knife, a multi-blade screwdriver, and a slip-joint pliers, I am thinking about adding an adjustable wrench and electrical tape. I am also trying to think of other tools I might need when someone asks me to look at something that does not work.
 

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Don’t forget your Hyundai road-side assistant card or have number handy. Never used it over two Hyundai vehicles yet.

I keep a battery smart charger, to help jump start if I need or anyone else needs a Jump start. one in all my vehicles. I miss the days you could jump start by pushing your vehicle, at least they are a shrinking in numbers. At least one of my vehicle is a stick but never needed too lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Don’t forget your Hyundai road-side assistant card or have number handy. Never used it over two Hyundai vehicles yet.

I keep a battery smart charger, to help jump start if I need or anyone else needs a Jump start. one in all my vehicles. I miss the days you could jump start by pushing your vehicle, at least they are a shrinking in numbers. At least one of my vehicle is a stick but never needed too lol
I am thinking of times when my wife wants to swing by someone’s house to make contact about something. Then the woman who lives there says to me, “While you are here, would you mind looking at my lamp? There was a flash of light last night and it quit working.” It helps if I have a few tools in my SC, even if they are not for use on the SC.
 

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2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz SEL AWD
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@Phil75 that's not a bad idea at all to have a small tool set in the vehicle. You never know when it may come in handy.

Don’t forget your Hyundai road-side assistant card or have number handy. Never used it over two Hyundai vehicles yet.
I had never needed roadside assistance either until the day I was driving my Santa Cruz home from the dealership after I bought it and got a flat left front tire. It was 100 degrees that day and I was on the side of a busy interstate. Told myself I was going to take advantage of the roadside assistance that day!

There is actually a roadside assistance sticker on the left rear passenger window with the phone # you can call if you need it. So long as a window tinter or owner didn't remove it.
Font Bumper Gas Rectangle Tints and shades
 

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You wanted a list...
Think about where you might be traveling. Some things are great for an immediate problem. Others are needed if you are not near help and need to survive through a longer time frame type of self help issue. What if you find yourself at another vehicle's accident, or need to render aid a distance from your car. How will you take things you need with you? Can you find them quickly (labeled)?
Obviously you want stuff for your own breakdown on a road. Think about other places you might find yourself in, like a bad storm, camping, flood, blizzard, being stuck alone somewhere for a long time.
Always assume your kit will get wet, muddy, or bio contaminated. Store important things in a sealed something. You may also get filthy, plan for it because it could happen in lousy weather conditions. How many times will you be getting back into your car while covered in muck?
I've not needed to use everything below, but nice to know I could. If things here are stuff you have never used or been trained on, you might still want to have them in case another person nearby does know.
Good luck.

The main list:
Fire extinguisher.
Window breaker, seatbelt cutter. One pair with fire extinguisher, one pair in driver's easy reach.
Notepad. Black sharpies. Pens. Lots of sharpies - scattered all over and with things that need notes written on them.
For working on hot electrical connections, insulate your ratchet handle with heat shrink or thick layer of tape. Same for other wrench handles and screwdrivers. Prevents a short.
Good work gloves. Several pairs of latex gloves (in a ziplock).
Deep well metric sockets. Get these in 3/8 drive with another ratchet.
10mm combination wrench. (open end, box end)
2 Tarps. One for outside use, one for your seat (keep outside gunk off). Waterproof absorbent pad, like used on a hospital bed.
Duct tape and electrical tape. Good quality stuff like gorilla tape, scotch 33. Keep in plastic bag because heat will smear glue.
Tye wraps. 8 inch or longer.
List of contact names and phone numbers. Assume your phone is dead. Family, friends, roadside maintenance, Hyundai help, dealer, tow company. Laminate it.
Set up your phone as emergency key fob. Practice using it.
Extra 10mm, 12mm, 8mm sockets. Drive extensions that have the small bearings to lock pieces together when used. 12" minimum total length. Test by trying to lower spare tire.
Flashlight with mechanical click switch (so it doesn't drain battery while off). Lithium battery in it. Spare lithium batteries, one preferably stored in a second flashlight.
If you have the 117vac inverter, AC LED work light with long cord.
Red blinking light.
Rain gear and hat.
Roll of paper towels (perhaps just the final 1/4 of a roll).
Towels.
Assorted ziplock bags (for parts).
Fuses.
Wire stripper with cutter. Couple assd sizes of wire nuts, crimp lugs, and crimp splices.
12v inflator.
Jumper cables.
If you have locking lug nuts, grab a couple of the regular nuts taken off car when they were installed. (if you lose one when changing a tire)
50' 1/4 nylon rope. Brick of paracord.
Plastic trash bags - various sizes.
Empty gas can.
Reflective safety vest.
Whistle.
Spare pair of glasses.
Ratchet straps.

Extras on the stretch list:
Money and a credit card.
For changing a tire - 1/2" impact driver, battery charger, torque stick, extender and socket to lower tire.
Hammer.
Vice grip plyers.
Multiple sizes of slip plyers, screw drivers, etc.
6 long gutter hanging nails.
Pry bar.
Tire plug repair kit.
Reflective "HELP" big banner. 6ft strips of reflective tape (x4).
Boy scout mirror. Get one by disassembling an old HDD and removing data platter.
Emergency food and water.
Water filter to decontaminate field water.
Strong magnets.
Clean dry clothing.
Hand and feet warmers.
Smoke grenades.
Life vest. For yourself, or on a rope to toss to someone.
Pillow, inflatable.
Solar charged battery bank. Phone charging cords (micro usb, usb-c, apple).
Tow rope.
Air horn (stored disassembled so can stays pressurized). SOS honk is Short Short Short pause Long Long Long pause Short Short Short
Camera that uses AA batteries. Keep lithium batters out of it so they don't gradually discharge.
Flares in hard plastic container. Make one from plumbing PVC pipe and caps.
Quart of oil (in a ziplock).
CB and GMRS radio.
Weather radio.
Tracker devices in every bag.

Better first aid supplies. Many of these will need periodic replacing because of heat and shelf life.
Quick Clot packet. If used, use sharpie to write time applied on packet and tape entire packet to victim; doctors will need that info.
Latex gloves (lots). N95 masks. Face shield. Disinfecting spray (for yourself after rendering aid).
Gauze (rolls and 5x9 pads), vet wrap, non-stick pads.
Scissors that can cut off clothing..
Regular tape.
Bandages.
Wound cleaning solution.
Sterile water.
Triple antibiotic.
Barf Bag.
Eye wash kit.
SPo2 finger monitor. (easy pulse check)
CPR microshield.
Blankets.
Tourniquets. If used, use sharpie to write time applied to victim on (or next to) the tourniquet; doctors will need that info.
Splint. Consider small rolled up type instead of bulky cardboard that can degrade with moisture.
Sealed cake icing squeeze tube (for low blood sugar).
Cold packs.
Alcohol wipes, disinfectant wipes.
Benadryl.
Tweezers.
Wasp spray anti-itch.
Burn gel.

Huge stretch:
Caution triangles.
Allevyn coverings.
AED.
3m "kind release" tape.
BVM.
Chest seals.
Cervical collar.
EPI pen.
Glucose meter. (legalities of poking someone are up to you to research in your area)
Satellite phone. (my dream)
Defensive weapons. (bear spray, wasp spray)
 

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I am thinking of times when my wife wants to swing by someone’s house to make contact about something. Then the woman who lives there says to me, “While you are here, would you mind looking at my lamp? There was a flash of light last night and it quit working.” It helps if I have a few tools in my SC, even if they are not for use on the SC.
Yeah I keep a tool kit, level, square, extra knife, lots of assorted ropes and tape measurer in mine for the same reason. Usually fixing or hanging something at my parents house. I need to get some jumper cables. Had a lady ask if I could jump her car.. and I could not.
 

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This is my list...

Duct tape and zip ties (these really can fix most things)
Work gloves.
Rope, bungee cords and ratchet straps.
Spare clothes (weather can change quickly along your route, you might get hot, wet or cold)
Small set of sockets (to figure out what sizes just start matching up any exposed bolts, you'll be amazed how many are 10mm)
Breaker bar and socket you know fits the lugs of your trailer (they are NOT the same size as your vehicle)
Screw drivers, adjustable wrench, pliers (channel lock type and needle nose)
Spare fuses and even some wiring along with cutters/dikes to quickly wiring something up.
Extra quart of oil.
Small block of wood (works as a wheel chock and/or a flat surface for the factory jack)
Tire pressure gauge.
Jumper cables.
First aid kit.
Glow sticks (they provide lighting, require no batteries, are totally waterproof and safe - can be used for signalling or locating)
WD-40 and grease.
Lighter.
Pocket knife
Multi-tool (I have a Gerber)
 

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This is my list...

Duct tape and zip ties (these really can fix most things)
Work gloves.
Rope, bungee cords and ratchet straps.
Spare clothes (weather can change quickly along your route, you might get hot, wet or cold)
Small set of sockets (to figure out what sizes just start matching up any exposed bolts, you'll be amazed how many are 10mm)
Breaker bar and socket you know fits the lugs of your trailer (they are NOT the same size as your vehicle)
Screw drivers, adjustable wrench, pliers (channel lock type and needle nose)
Spare fuses and even some wiring along with cutters/dikes to quickly wiring something up.
Extra quart of oil.
Small block of wood (works as a wheel chock and/or a flat surface for the factory jack)
Tire pressure gauge.
Jumper cables.
First aid kit.
Glow sticks (they provide lighting, require no batteries, are totally waterproof and safe - can be used for signalling or locating)
WD-40 and grease.
Lighter.
Pocket knife
Multi-tool (I have a Gerber)
First 4 lines here can get you in a lot of trouble though if the wrong person sees it! 😂😂😂
 

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This is my list...

Duct tape and zip ties (these really can fix most things)
Work gloves.
Rope, bungee cords and ratchet straps.
Spare clothes (weather can change quickly along your route, you might get hot, wet or cold)
Small set of sockets (to figure out what sizes just start matching up any exposed bolts, you'll be amazed how many are 10mm)
Breaker bar and socket you know fits the lugs of your trailer (they are NOT the same size as your vehicle)
Screw drivers, adjustable wrench, pliers (channel lock type and needle nose)
Spare fuses and even some wiring along with cutters/dikes to quickly wiring something up.
Extra quart of oil.
Small block of wood (works as a wheel chock and/or a flat surface for the factory jack)
Tire pressure gauge.
Jumper cables.
First aid kit.
Glow sticks (they provide lighting, require no batteries, are totally waterproof and safe - can be used for signalling or locating)
WD-40 and grease.
Lighter.
Pocket knife
Multi-tool (I have a Gerber)
Hey, we're friends right? I'm on your good side, right? Right?
 
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